Martini Cromeri ex secundo libro de origine & rebus gestis Polonorum nonnulli loci dubii

Matthaeus

Vemortuicida strenuus
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Any idea what "eq; repub." could be? Maybe "atque"?

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Any idea why "uendae" with a lower-case 'u' here?

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Any particular reason why he writes ad certam diem, but later has status curriculo dies? Is there really a difference between using the masculine vs. the feminine version?
 

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Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
Any idea what "eq; repub." could be? Maybe "atque"?
Eque republica.
Any idea why "uendae" with a lower-case 'u' here?
Because in that place it's being mentioned as a common noun meaning "(fishing) hook".
Any particular reason why he writes ad certam diem, but later has status curriculo dies? Is there really a difference between using the masculine vs. the feminine version?
In classical Latin, the feminine is used mostly of an appointed date. Both passages here are about an appointed date, so you might have expected the feminine in both, but well. I'm not sure there's really any explanation.
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
Eque is the preposition e (ex) + -que.

E re publica is a fairly common expression meaning "in the interests of the sate" or the like.
 
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Matthaeus

Vemortuicida strenuus
Ok, thanks for all your help! ;)
 
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