Meaning of Amy - "Beloved" and "To be loved"

penguin

New Member
Hi I really need the latin translation of the meaning of "amy"

Amy means "to be loved" or "beloved"


Could you please help me with the translation of both of the above?
 

Iohannes Aurum

Technicus Auxiliarius

penguin

New Member
ahh yeahh thanks - ive seen that site, hmm

but ive done some looking around

and possible answers are:

amari ?

ut ameris? not really sure about that one..
 

Iohannes Aurum

Technicus Auxiliarius
Well then, try installing this software, since it is the most complete free Latin-English dictionary available and has the term "beloved."
 

Bitmap

Civis Illustris
to be loved = amatur
beloved = amata
 

scrabulista

Consul
Staff member
amatur = "he/she/it is loved."

The passive infinitive is amari.

The future passive participle is amandus, -a, -um (amanda is feminine). This one can be translated as "to be loved" or "about to be loved." Also amanda est = "she must be loved."
 

Iohannes Aurum

Technicus Auxiliarius
Amanda (the name) is derived from Amanda est.
 

Imber Ranae

Ranunculus Iracundus
Iohannes Aurum dixit:
Well then, try installing this software, since it is the most complete free Latin-English dictionary available and has the term "beloved."
Or not, since it will likely just confuse her.
 

Imber Ranae

Ranunculus Iracundus
penguin dixit:
haha what is a passive infinitive? :/
Don't worry about it. People are giving you way more info than you need or could possibly be expected to know what to do with.

so is ut ameris completely wrong then?
It isn't a complete sentence. It means "so that you may be loved". You might say, for example, Tu pulchram te facis ut ameris "You make yourself beautiful so that you may be loved," which is the same as saying, "You make yourself beautiful in order to be loved". But that's the only sense in which it means "to be loved".

You should be more specific about what you want translated, since "to be loved" is really quite vague and is not the same as "beloved". In English, placing the word "to" before a verb makes what is called the infinitive. Latin has special forms for its infinitives. Thus the Latin equivalent of the passive infinitive "to be loved" is amari. But this really doesn't mean much of anything by itself, just as "to be loved" doesn't mean much in English without other words around it to give it context. Moreover, the Latin infinitive, though roughly equivalent to the English infinitive, doesn't have all the same syntactical uses as its English counterpart. That is why Latin uses ut ameris in the sentence above rather than amari.

"Beloved" is an adjective, which can be used to describe a person. As an adjective it is considerably less vague than an infinitive. The Latin equivalent of "beloved" would be amatus for a male, and amata for a female.

Does that help you?
 

penguin

New Member
oh wow thanks heaps..


so if i want to get a tat, should i be getting Amari .. or otherwise?

because i want the meaning as close as possible to the English definition of my name -
"beloved" or "to be loved".


so to make it less vague.. it should in a sense mean "to be loved (definite sense)"


does that make sense =/ sighh
 

Matthaeus

Vemortuicida strenuus
As Imber said, you're not providing enough context. You could go with amanda, but that's a future passive participle, implying necessity, which functions as an adjective, and therefore, as a modifier, cannot stand alone, but must have a noun, e.g. 'the girl to be loved' would be puella amanda. Does that make sense?
 

Imber Ranae

Ranunculus Iracundus
penguin dixit:
oh wow thanks heaps..


so if i want to get a tat, should i be getting Amari .. or otherwise?

because i want the meaning as close as possible to the English definition of my name -
"beloved" or "to be loved".


so to make it less vague.. it should in a sense mean "to be loved (definite sense)"


does that make sense =/ sighh
Your name is Amy, correct? The website that Iohannes Aurum linked you to in the very first response to this thread pretty much answers this question for you:

behindthename dixit:
AMY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: AY-mee

English form of the Old French name Amée meaning "beloved" (modern French aimée), a vernacular form of the Latin Amata. As an English name, Amy was in use in the Middle Ages and was revived in the 19th century.
In other words, the Old French word amée, from which your name is derived, is an adjective that means "beloved" (it's really a past participle functioning as an adjective, but never mind that). It doesn't mean "to be loved" or "to love" or anything like that. Old French, together with the rest of the Romance languages, is itself derived from Latin, and the Latin equivalent of Old French amée is amata. So that's what you want: Amata. Very simple.
 

Imber Ranae

Ranunculus Iracundus
Matthaeus dixit:
As Imber said, you're not providing enough context. You could go with amanda, but that's a future passive participle, implying necessity, which functions as an adjective, and therefore, as a modifier, cannot stand alone, but must have a noun, e.g. 'the girl to be loved' would be puella amanda. Does that make sense?
But her name isn't Amanda. Unless I'm completely mistaken, it's Amy.
 

Matthaeus

Vemortuicida strenuus
Right. I was simply explaining my point.
 

penguin

New Member
Alright..

Thanks so much for your help guys :)

But ahahah i'm vain and i guess the look of the tat matter to me alot as well..

can you guys suggest anything else i could get with similar meaning?
 

Imber Ranae

Ranunculus Iracundus
penguin dixit:
Alright..

Thanks so much for your help guys :)

But ahahah i'm vain and i guess the look of the tat matter to me alot as well..

can you guys suggest anything else i could get with similar meaning?
Not really. Since I'm not at all sure what you find so aesthetically displeasing about amata, how can I be sure any other suggestion won't be similarly rejected by you? We can't read your mind.
 
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