Meaning of Amy - "Beloved" and "To be loved"

scrabulista

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Dilecta is the past participle of diligo.
Amata is the past participle of amo.
Both verbs mean "love;" diligo is somewhat milder than amo.

Amata can mean "beloved one," as can dilecta.
 

penguin

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ohh i see i see.. thanks.


Is there an alternative that has like 2 words?

like et amari..? or similar to. haha sorry im just guessing..
 

Matthaeus

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I don't understand the question.
 

scrabulista

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My French is nonexistent, but apparently etre aime(e) is "to be loved," with etre being "to be" and aime(e) = amatus, -a.

So if you really wanted to copy that, you could do esse amata = "to have been loved," although esse = "to be" but somehow I'm reminded of a Lewis Carroll novel. ;)

You could do something like:

amata femina or amata mulier = "beloved woman"
amata puella = "beloved girl"
et = "and." Did you really want that?

Maybe you want something like:
ea amata (est) = she (has been) loved ?
 

Matthaeus

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amata erit
 

scrabulista

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amata erit can be more like "she will have been loved."
A raw future passive can be amabitur (but then this is can be "he/she/it will be loved."
 

penguin

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oh thanks!

so which do you guys prefer? - which has closest meaning to my name? (beloved)

semper amata - always loved

amata erit - she will be loved

amari - to be loved

amata - beloved

or any other suggestions along the lines of that? :)
 

scrabulista

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If you're looking for something that actually could be someone's name, Amata is the best choice. Indeed, in Roman mythology there actually was a Queen Amata.

http://classics.uc.edu/~johnson/epic/aeneidsum.html (See Book 7).

However if you're just looking for a Roman word or phrase that sort of looks like your name, any of them are just fine.
 

cinefactus

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penguin dixit:
so which do you guys prefer? - which has closest meaning to my name? (beloved)
As Imber Ranae said, beloved translates as amata (or dilecta).
I would concur with him that amari doesn't seem to make sense as a single word.

If you want a passive you could try amare, which is the command 'be loved'. And which if you omit the space becomes a homograph of the English translation of your name. (It also means, 'to love').

amata erit means 'she will have been loved'.
 

penguin

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ok i promise you guys last question - im getting it on sat:)

can i combine any word with "amari" for it to make sense?

And is "semper amata" correct - for "always loved" 100%??

thanks so much xx
 

Imber Ranae

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penguin dixit:
ok i promise you guys last question - im getting it on sat:)

can i combine any word with "amari" for it to make sense?
Yes. For example: volo amari "I want to be loved", vult amari "she [or he] wants to be loved".
 

Matthaeus

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Sure...volumus amari...vultis amari...volunt amari...anything else?
 

cinefactus

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debeo amari - I ought to be loved
licet amari - it is permissable to be loved
oportet amari - it is right to be loved / one should be loved
nolite amari - don't be loved
amari possum - I can be loved

or some quotes:
Brutum a me amari intellegis - You realize that Brutus was loved by me (Cicero)
amari si velis - If you wish to be loved (Pubilius Syrus)
Vxor legitimus debet quasi census amari - A lawful wife should be loved like one's property (Petronius)

In fact, if you can express a sentence in English containing the words, 'to be loved', you can probably find some way of expressing it in Latin with amari.
 

penguin

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ahh wow thanks.

would semper amari make any sense?

quickk reply would be MOSTTT appreciated. i'm getting it tomorrowww!!
 

Matthaeus

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Cinefactus dixit:
Brutum a me amari intellegis - You realize that Brutus was loved by me (Cicero)
Shouldn't that be 'you realise that Brutus is [being] loved by me'? Sorry, it's just that this confused me. Wouldn't 'was loved' be amatum fuisse? :?
 
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