metuere

meisenimverbis

Civis Illustris
I've been thinking for a while about this:

metuĕre has a short e;
is it metúere or could it be métuere? (I'm used to the first one, but I don't really know why, once I believe noone ever taught me it should be so...)

Is it possible that the u acts as a w? Has any Roman author written anything about this situation?
 
Collatinus says it's "metúere" (infinitive), but also "metuére" in passive.

Is it possible that the u acts as a w? Has any Roman author written anything about this situation?
Yes, "u" is pronounced as /w/ in "quārē", but not in "metuere". Frances E. Lord in The Roman Pronunciation of Latin (§29) quotes several Roman authors (Priscian, Marius Victorinus, &c.) writing about the pronunciation of "U/V", so it could be a start point.
 
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meisenimverbis

Civis Illustris
fúere or fuére?
 

meisenimverbis

Civis Illustris
(Sorry. I was thinking fueris, fuerit.)
 

Bitmap

Civis Illustris
In fueris and fuerit, the e is short and the stress is on the u.
 

meisenimverbis

Civis Illustris
Sometimes something makes such sense that you'd like it to be... But I guess it'll only be something to be considered for medieval Latin...
 
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