minimique ad eos mercatores saepe commeant

john abshire

Active Member
From Caesar
.......,.minimique ad eos mercatores saepe commeant atque ea quae ad effeminandos animos pertinent important, ....
........And merchants less frequently resort to them and import those things which (tend to effeminate the mind),......
(Pertain to an effeminating mind)?

Is the second clause in brackets correct? And is it more literal?
- is “those things” the translation for “ea”?
If so, why is it not eos? Accusative and masculine?
Or better, illos? Or res illos?
 

Cinefactus

Censor
Staff member
ea is accusative neuter plural, those things

for commeant, perhaps—visit
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
Minime is a superlative ("least") not a comparative ("less").
Is the second clause in brackets correct? And is it more literal?
I guess a very literal translation would be "towards minds having-to-be-effeminated", but it fails to convey the meaning.
- is “those things” the translation for “ea”?
If so, why is it not eos? Accusative and masculine?
Or better, illos? Or res illos?
Because eos or illos would be masculine and would mean "those people", not "those things".

Res eas/illas (eas or illas must agree in the feminine with res) would be grammatically correct, but it's more usual in this context to just use the substantivized neuter plural pronoun (ea).
 

john abshire

Active Member
Minime is a superlative ("least") not a comparative ("less").

I guess a very literal translation would be "towards minds having-to-be-effeminated", but it fails to convey the meaning.
Because eos or illos would be masculine and would mean "those people", not "those things".

Res eas/illas (eas or illas must agree in the feminine with res) would be grammatically correct, but it's more usual in this context to just use the substantivized neuter plural pronoun (ea).
-then is "id" used for "this thing"?

quae ad effeminandos animos pertinent.
the book translation= "which tend to effeminate the mind"
Is the following also correct?
"which are conducive for the purpose of effeminating the mind." ??
or/
"which pertain to the purpose of effeminating the mind." ??

ad effeminandos here means "for the purpose of effeminating", or/ "to effeminate", so i got that.
the question is on the definition of pertinent
I could not find a definition of pertinent= "they tend (to)";
I guess "they are conducive to" or "they pertain to" means "they tend to" ??
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
-then is "id" used for "this thing"?
Yes.
quae ad effeminandos animos pertinent.
the book translation= "which tend to effeminate the mind"
Is the following also correct?
"which are conducive for the purpose of effeminating the mind." ??
or/
"which pertain to the purpose of effeminating the mind." ??
Yes, those are correct, albeit less elegant.
 
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