Tattoo My God, my country, my honor.

Issacus Divus

ᛏᚱᛁᚾᚴᚱ•ᚼᛁᛘᛘᛁᚾᛋ
Maybe Deus meus, mea patria, meus honos.
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
I thought there might be an original Latin version but, if Wikipedia is correct, "Since the time of Frederick VI, Danish monarchs have only used mottos in the Danish language".

Here's the original Danish, by the way:

"Min Gud, mit land, min ære"

It sounds so much like Old English!

I was wondering what sort of "honor" is meant here. Does it mean the honor/office of a king, or does it mean a more moral sort of honor (the quality of being morally honorable)? If it's the former, honos fits the bill, but if it's the latter it might be better translated with a different word.

Stylistic thing: I think it would look better if the noun and possessive were in the same order in order in all three parts.
 

Issacus Divus

ᛏᚱᛁᚾᚴᚱ•ᚼᛁᛘᛘᛁᚾᛋ
Stylistic thing: I think it would look better if the noun and possessive were in the same order in order in all three parts.
So do I. I just don’t like saying Meus in front of Deus much, but I know it doesn’t matter.
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
So do I. I just don’t like saying Meus in front of Deus much, but I know it doesn’t matter.
I agree it sounds a little funny, perhaps because we read it in the reverse order all the time. Maybe you should put the possessive at the end in all three parts.
 

Issacus Divus

ᛏᚱᛁᚾᚴᚱ•ᚼᛁᛘᛘᛁᚾᛋ
I agree it sounds a little funny, perhaps because we read it in the reverse order all the time. Maybe you should put the possessive at the end in all three parts.
I thought of doing that.

Yeah, naturally. But a tad closer to OE, I think.

OE:

Min God, min land, min ar*.

*Means honos rather than the more moral sense, I think.

Mein Gott, mein Land, meine Ehre (?)
Oh, weird. IS is heiður. I would’ve thought that the Danish word would be closer...
 

Issacus Divus

ᛏᚱᛁᚾᚴᚱ•ᚼᛁᛘᛘᛁᚾᛋ
Nvm, cognate is eir for IS.
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
"Min Gud, mit land, min ære"
I first wrote "min land", assuming "mit" was a typo, but apparently I was wrong, since it appears with "mit" everywhere on Google and "mit" is found for "my" in other Danish kings' mottoes. I guess there's a rule that "min" becomes "mit" before certain letters.
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
Interesting how different that "mit" is from OE and German. Quite unexpected.

Well, I guess the difference between West and North Germanic has to show somewhere.
 

Bitmap

Civis Illustris
Swedish and Norwegian do it similarly.
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
So, definitely a North Germanic thing.

I wonder if that t has anything to do with the d in id, istud and illud. And quod and quid and the t in what.
 

Bitmap

Civis Illustris
Germanic demonstratives also end in t (or s in German) in the neuter ;)
 

Bitmap

Civis Illustris
I mean things like dit, dat, het ... dies, das, es in German, but the s is the result of a consonant shift.
 

Issacus Divus

ᛏᚱᛁᚾᚴᚱ•ᚼᛁᛘᛘᛁᚾᛋ
I first wrote "min land", assuming "mit" was a typo, but apparently I was wrong, since it appears with "mit" everywhere on Google and "mit" is found for "my" in other Danish kings' mottoes. I guess there's a rule that "min" becomes "mit" before certain letters.
Since IS still has mitt, at first I thought Danish just had it simplified.
 
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