Names You Like

Dantius

Homo Sapiens
Staff member
Rhexenor
(a name shared by two figures in mythology: father of Chalciope, second wife of Aegeus, and father of Arete, wife and niece of Alcinous)
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
That rocks.
 

Dantius

Homo Sapiens
Staff member
Damasen (a giant who appears in Nonnus' Dionysiaca) is an interesting name. I don't know if I like it. The -en ending sounds very non-Greek/Latin to me.
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
Bohemond
Tancred
 

meisenimverbis

Civis Illustris
What makes or might make a person like a name?

Sometimes I'm inclined to say "I like this name", but something holds me. (A second thought?) Maybe I don't have a good reason to like that name. On the other hand, other names I like without any reason. But there are some that somewhat demand of me an extra reason for electing it 'a name that I like'...
 
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meisenimverbis

Civis Illustris
Zemaragdus is not officially a name, but I have a character with this name (in a medieval theme--not so much a story...), so I think I can consider it a name...
 

Issacus Divus

H₃rḗǵs h₁n̥dʰéri diwsú
I like ones that are cool looking, or cool in meaning.
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
While the meaning sometimes plays a role, most of the time, I like a name just because of its sound. Now, why I like a name's sound is something I can't quite explain.
 

Issacus Divus

H₃rḗǵs h₁n̥dʰéri diwsú
I like Gilgamesh. Why? Only Enki and Ziusudra know.
 

Adrian

Civis Illustris
I like ancient polish names
1) BOGUSŁAW : Means "glory of God" from the Slavic elements bogu "god" + slava "glory".
2) BOLESŁAW Derived from the Slavic elements bolye "more, greater" + slava "glory".
3) MIECZYSŁAW, Derived from the Slavic element mechi "sword" combined with slava "glory". "He who earned glory by sword"
4) BORZYWOJ, Borzuj - Borz(y)- ("to fight") + "-woj, -uj" ("warriror"). "fighting warrior"
5) MŚCIWOJ, Mszczujwoj – „mścić (się)” (to avenge) + "woj”(warrior) - "vengful warrior"
6) WOJOSŁAW, Wojesław, Wojisław, Wosław – "Woj-" („wojownik”) + "-sław" "he who earned fame in war"

@Matthaeus @Hemo Rusticus
 
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Issacus Divus

H₃rḗǵs h₁n̥dʰéri diwsú
BOLESŁAW is cognate with Hercules, methinks.
 

Issacus Divus

H₃rḗǵs h₁n̥dʰéri diwsú
Or rather, similar in meaning. Ἥρᾱ (Hḗrā, “Hera”) +‎ -κλῆς (-klês, “glory”). A real cognate might be Yugoslav.
 

Adrian

Civis Illustris
@Issacus Divus - a polish name Jarosław would suit you ("Jaryło/ Yarylon" - proto-slavic deity of the sun + "-slava" glory)
Jarosław = "Glory of the Sun"

Also polish name (quite popular in PRL era) Stanisław - lat. Stanislaus ; Станислав (Bulgarian, Russian, Serbian), Stanislas (French), Stanislaus (German), Stanislovas (Lithuanian), Staņislavs (Latvian), Stanislao (Italian), Ainéislis (Irish/Gaelic), Estanislao (Spanish) and Szaniszló (Magyar/Hungarian).
Etymology ( "stanie się/ stawać się" - to become + "-slava" glory (eng. "He who achieves glory)
 

Etaoin Shrdlu

Civis Illustris
@Adrian, by 'PRL era' do you mean that Stanisław is no longer popular? It's always been one of the most common names, I'd have thought.

I met a Bolesław a couple of days ago, & didn't realise I should have valued the moment. Don't know anyone with the other names, though.
 

Adrian

Civis Illustris
Yes Etaoin, untill 1989 original polish names like Stanisław, Mieczysław, Zbigniew, Bolesław, Władysław, were popular and common male names in Poland.
Nowadays parents go with foreign origin names.

I assume you know some polish so these materials won't be any problem for you (I prepared also links translated into english)



 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
Nicephorus.
 

Issacus Divus

H₃rḗǵs h₁n̥dʰéri diwsú
Midhir.
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
Artaphernes.
 
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