Narro - proper understanding in other languages

Koudy

New Member
Dear people of internet,

I would like to know for sure what conjugated word 'narro' in latin means. Does my archaic knowledge of latin remembers well that it is as 'speak' or 'tell' in second person of singular? Can it be used as a supportive phrase for people to express their ideas? I am thinking of a name for my small project and this is what I want.
Thank you for your response and vale!
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
Hello,
Does my archaic knowledge of latin remembers well that it is as 'speak' or 'tell' in second person of singular?
No, it's first person singular, "I tell" or "I am telling".
Can it be used as a supportive phrase for people to express their ideas?
I am not sure what you mean. Can you elaborate?
 

Koudy

New Member
Hello,
No, it's first person singular, "I tell" or "I am telling".

I am not sure what you mean. Can you elaborate?
Oh, sure, the second person is 'narras', right?
I start a small project where a person should get the support not to be afraid to express whatever he or she wants to say. Because it is also about language and I used to study a bit of latin when I was young, I wanted to get some name in latin. Narrare sounds good to me so I wanted to conjugate it to meaning 'Talk!'
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
Oh, sure, the second person is 'narras', right?
Yes.
Narrare sounds good to me so I wanted to conjugate it to meaning 'Talk!'
In that case you could say narra! or narrate! Both mean "tell (me)!"; narra is a command to one person and narrate a command to a group.
 

Koudy

New Member
Yes.

In that case you could say narra! or narrate! Both mean "tell (me)!"; narra is a command to one person and narrate a command to a group.
Narra sounds actually good, too! I still like more 'Narro', I don't know why, but then the meaning of the name would be 'I join the project, I try and then I can Narro, too.' It wouldn't be my command as leader of the project but it would be their wish as they join the project - to be telling their story. Both can actually work. Now I need to choose. Thank you so much, it was very important to me!
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
You're welcome.
it would be their wish as they join the project
Narro doesn't convey a wish, but a statement: "I tell".
 

Koudy

New Member
You're welcome.

Narro doesn't convey a wish, but a statement: "I tell".
Exactly what I mean! If they enter the project, they are determined to make it and to improve themselves. And upon completing the training, they will be able to 'Narro - I tell' - because there will be no fear, no obstacle.
So if it is 'Narra!' then it's my - coach's - command to my clients and it describes the period of their training (when I am teaching them). And if it is 'Narro!' then it's their supportive expression after successful training and it implies the end of the training and their new ability to speak.
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
Ah, I think I see.
 
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