Homework Nominative Case If A Phrase Is Describing The Subject

Good afternoon, everyone. For this activity, I have to create five Latin sentences about myself (I am Julius Caesar). I'm wondering about sentence one. Because powerful general is describing the subject, and it follows a linking verb, would this noun-adjective phrase be in the nominative case and not in the accusative? Also, to keep everyone updated on my progress, I have since learned adverbs, the perfect tense, comparative adjectives, personal pronouns, possessive pronouns, and the relative pronoun.

Sum potens imperator.
I am a powerful general.

Rego cum forti legione.
I rule with a strong army.

Populus amat me.
The people love me.

Servo et tuto Romam.
I protect and guard Rome.

Senatus volunt perimere me.
The Senate wants to assassinate me.

Thanks for the help,

Brian
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
Because powerful general is describing the subject, and it follows a linking verb, would this noun-adjective phrase be in the nominative case and not in the accusative?
Yes.
Rego cum forti legione.
I rule with a strong army.
Legio is just a legion. An army is exercitus.
Populus amat me.
The people love me.

Servo et tuto Romam.
I protect and guard Rome.
Well done.
Senatus volunt perimere me.
The Senate wants to assassinate me.
Check subject-verb agreement.
 
Great, thank you for the clarification.

Legio is just a legion. An army is exercitus.
Okay, I was not aware of that.

Check subject-verb agreement.
Ah, I see what you're saying. Because the Senate is referring to one body as a whole, the verb would be third-person singular and not third-person plural.

I appreciate your clarifications and input, Sarah. Here are my revised sentences.

Sum potens imperator.
I am a powerful general.

Rego cum forti exercitu.
I rule with a strong army.

Populus amat me.
The people love me.

Servo et tuto Romam.
I protect and guard Rome.

Senatus vult perimere me.
The Senate wants to assassinate me.
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
Ah, I see what you're saying. Because the Senate is referring to one body as a whole, the verb would be third-person singular and not third-person plural.
That's right. Constructions where the verb agrees with the logical number of a word instead of its grammatical number, as in "my family are great" (where "family" is singular in form but refers to several people and the plural verb "are" can be used in agreement with the implied plurality) are rare in Latin.
I appreciate your clarifications and input, Sarah. Here are my revised sentences.

Sum potens imperator.
I am a powerful general.

Rego cum forti exercitu.
I rule with a strong army.

Populus amat me.
The people love me.

Servo et tuto Romam.
I protect and guard Rome.

Senatus vult perimere me.
The Senate wants to assassinate me.
Good!
 
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