Novels you've read that have left the deepest impression

Bestiola

Speculatrix
Staff member
There is also one lyrical-fantastic novel Mor by Đuro Sudeta, which I could never got enough of, but I don't think it was ever translated into English unfortunately.
 

Bestiola

Speculatrix
Staff member
What does Mor translate to, or is it a name?
It is a name ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Đuro_Sudeta) - and it has such nice lyrical style, whole novel is like a big poem. He wrote some nice poetry as well - before he tragically died very young from tuberculosis.

The novel starts with a description of a lilac branch (grana jorgovana) and I really regret that it hasn't been translated to other languages.

http://os-odra-zg.skole.hr/upload/os-odra-zg/images/static3/788/File/sudeta_mor.pdf
 
The Old Man and the Sea: Hemingway.
A timeless classic, I suspect it probably would of been quite popular with the ancient Romans as well.
 

malleolus

Civis Illustris
The Old Man and the Sea: Hemingway.
A timeless classic, I suspect it probably would of been quite popular with the ancient Romans as well.
As long as the old man was consul. :)
 

malleolus

Civis Illustris
I'm not sure - what about commanding the Roman fleet?
 
Orwell, Animal Farm
Ellison, The Invisible Man
Borchert, Short stories *too depressing for words*
Tolstoy, Anna Karenina
Austen, Pride and Prejudice
Defoe, Robinson Crusoe
Kafka, The Trial

Up until your post I'd not heard of Burchert or even the short lived Trummerliteratur movement. It's hard to imagine how tragic & hopeless those years near the end & directly after the war must've been for all concerned.

I have a book on my shelf by Alfred de Zayas, 'A Terrible Revenge'. It's an extremely sad & moving book & not for everyone. It has the power to stay with you for a lifetime like a stain that cannot be erased, but it's a book that needed to be written.
Antoney Beevor's 'Fall of Berlin' is also quite harrowing. Obviously, these aren't novels.

Borchert's book on short stories is now on my list of books to read.
 

Claudilla

Active Member
Morte D'Arthur
D'Aulaire's Greek Myths
Dhammapada
Lotus Sutra
The above really influenced my life: poetic, visionary, philosophy

But then I adore and reread:
P.G. Wodehouse
G.K. Chesterton (racist, ugh) but I enjoy his stories
Edgar Allan Poe
Wordsworth
Coleridge
Jane Austen
Rilke
interesting am I the first person to mention poets?
 

LacrimæRerum

New Member
I don't read fiction any more but I used to like Hesse's novels (especially Siddartha, Demian and Steppenwolf), Dostoevsky's dry humour in Crime and Punishment and Virginia Wolf's Mrs Dalloway. Also Yasunari Kawabata's Thousand Cranes.
I also like Hesse's works even now. He's not as famous in the Anglophone world as other Nobel Prize winners though... My favourite is also Demian; I read it when I was 12 (in English. Never learnt German, even though I may have appreciated it), and that book still lingers. I like to think my enlightenment in reading began thus. The Glass Bead Game was quite interesting too, with a lot of Latin references hidden away.

I prefer, personally, The Brothers Karamazov to Crime and Punishment, but I enjoyed both. As for Woolf... I tried To The Lighthouse but couldn't finish it, quite like One Hundred Years Of Solitude which currently resides at my bedside table under five or six other books.
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member

LacrimæRerum

New Member
Les Misérables by Victor Hugo
Demian by Hermann Hesse
Lolita by Vladimir Nabokov (I'm no paedophile. But the language is exquisite and I enjoy making Lolita references like Nabokov refers to Edgar Allen Poe)
The Golden Notebook by Doris Lessing
La Porte Étroite by André Gide (it used to be the most romantic fiction I ever read when I was thirteen... Now I think differently, but this is about the impacts, right?)
1984 by George Orwell

Luckily I obtained their copies, too, so that I may re-read my favourite parts.

Someone should make a play/drama/screenplay version of this thread, too. Before someone does that I'll be waiting for Godot.
 

LacrimæRerum

New Member
I read it (and did finish it) years ago, but I found it rather boring too.
Quite disappointing, because my trusted Goodreads (if you know that website) reviewers have been praising the book therefore I had high hopes.

The problem was that somehow I lost track of all the Aurelianos so that I no longer remember which is which.
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
I hardly remember anything of the story, to be honest. The only thing that has stuck to my memory is that story of a baby being born with a pig's tail.
 

LacrimæRerum

New Member
I hardly remember anything of the story, to be honest. The only thing that has stuck to my memory is that story of a baby being born with a pig's tail.
Well, you've been patient enough to finish it though. I'm halfway, and didn't get to the pig tail part (but have heard of it). I doubt if I will ever finish... Or indeed, whether it will redeem itself. But for now I'm not inclined to find out.
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
What about also mentioning the books we've read that have left the most boring impression? For me I think it was "L'étranger" by Camus. But, thankfully, unlike One Hundred Years of Solitude, it's short.

Edit: Oh, "L'assomoir" by Zola, too, which wears well its name. Still slightly less boring than "L'étranger", though, if I remember correctly.
 

Aurifex

Aedilis
Staff member
What about also mentioning the books we've read that have left the most boring impression? For me I think it was "L'étranger" by Camus.
"Hier maman est morte". I remember that line but not much else about it.
I read quite a bit of García Márquez when I was learning Spanish 20-odd years ago. Magic realism never really floated my boat, but for someone reared on the mainstream of 18th-20th century European fiction he evokes a refreshingly different world. He has a masterly prose style too.
 
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