Number 11

Issacus Divus

H₃rḗǵs h₁n̥dʰéri diwsú
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So, this isn’t homework but it is basic. I will post my attempt soon.
 

Issacus Divus

H₃rḗǵs h₁n̥dʰéri diwsú
So, the vocabulary of the first sentence is:

(The) good goddess has (a) noble plan. Right?

2.

The good goddesses are -_____


That one is hard for me...let me review my stuff quickly.

The good goddesses are dear in soul, the goddesses, *of the sea...

That can’t describe the goddess could it? Wrong number, right?

May a gracious well-taught Greek student help me out? Dantius?

3.
Cilla and Chrysa are beautiful; they are dear to the goddesses of the sea.

4.
The good goddess doesn’t have a bad soul.

5.

Good may the goddess be, who has no bad soul. (?)

ΟΗHHHH. δεινός. δεινός can be “terrible”. But I still don’t know what to do with it.

6.
The terrible clash is (coming) out of the sea.

7.
Cilla and Chrysa were upon the sea.

8.
The sea goddesses are dear to many souls, for they really are dear.
 

Bitmap

Civis Illustris
So, the vocabulary of the first sentence is:

(The) good goddess has (a) noble plan. Right?

Yes... 'A beautiful goddess' ... kalos is more like 'beautiful/noble' rather than 'good'.

The good goddesses are dear in soul, the goddesses, *of the sea...

That can’t describe the goddess could it? Wrong number, right?

May a gracious well-taught Greek student help me out? Dantius?

philos + dative ~~ to be dear to somebody/something
theas is genitive singular.

There are no definite articles, so you would have to translate it without definite articles in English:
'good goddesses are dear to the mind of a goddess of a wide sea'.

3.

Cilla and Chrysa are beautiful; they are dear to the goddesses of the sea.
thalassaon is plural.
'Dear to goddesses of seas.'

4.

The good goddess doesn’t have a bad soul.
See above: 'a beautiful goddess'
 

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Civis Illustris
5.

Good may the goddess be, who has no bad soul. (?)

ΟΗHHHH. δεινός. δεινός can be “terrible”. But I still don’t know what to do with it.

There is no 'no' in there and also no relative pronoun. de should be translated as 'but' here. A goddess is beautiful, but she has a bad soul.

Btw. note throughout that kalos actually means beautiful rather than good.
 

Bitmap

Civis Illustris
6.

The terrible clash is (coming) out of the sea.

I would have said sound/scream... and there's no definite article again.

Btw. I've just noticed that you translate the nouns with 'the' everywhere, but there are no definite articles in the Greek. You need to translate the nouns with indefinite articles everywhere.
 

Bitmap

Civis Illustris
8.

The sea goddesses are dear to many souls, for they really are dear.

It's probably a play on the active/passive mean of 'philos': 'Sea goddesses are dear to many souls, because they are friendly.'

Btw. do you really have to make 9 posts to present 8 short sentences?
 

Issacus Divus

H₃rḗǵs h₁n̥dʰéri diwsú
No, I just didn’t have time to edit them into one.
 

Issacus Divus

H₃rḗǵs h₁n̥dʰéri diwsú
9.

Α beautiful fatherland is dear to many beautiful souls.

10.
It was out of the bad fatherland. (?)

11.
There were many fires out of a dear fatherland, upon the dreadful sea.
 

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Civis Illustris
9.

Α beautiful fatherland is dear to many beautiful souls.
That's right.


10.
It was out of the bad fatherland. (?)
I took it as 'he/she was (came) from a bad fatherland.
Indefinite article again.

11.
There were many fires out of a dear fatherland, upon the dreadful sea.

en = in
deinos is like immanis in Latin.
It can mean 'terrible' in some contexts, but it can also just mean 'terribly big'.

There were many fires in a beloved fatherland upon (by) the wide sea. (cf. sentence 2)
 

Issacus Divus

H₃rḗǵs h₁n̥dʰéri diwsú
How stupid of me! You had already translated it as wide.


12.

Who doesn’t have a beautiful soul?
 

Issacus Divus

H₃rḗǵs h₁n̥dʰéri diwsú
Ξυνίημι. Ἐπαινῶ.
 

Issacus Divus

H₃rḗǵs h₁n̥dʰéri diwsú
I can’t really type in Greek for the first one yet...so forgive me for this first weird transliteration but:

1. Esti boulai kalai filai psychais Theaon?

(Is εστι βοθλαι καλαι φιλαι ψυχαις θεαων right?)
 

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Civis Illustris
I can’t really type in Greek for the yet...so forgive me for this first weird transliteration but:

1. Esti boulai kalai filai psychais Theaon?

(Is εστι βοθλαι καλαι φιλαι ψυχαις θεαων right?)

I don't have much practice with translation into Ancient Greek ... I suppose it would be better if some real expert answered that ...
I've also noticed that the text you had was some kind of dialect ... it wasn't Attic school Greek. So take my comments with some caution ...

'Are the good plans dear to the souls of the goddesses?'

- A yes/no-question is introduced by 'ar(a)'
- the verb needs to be in the plural
- you need to translate the direct articles
- I suppose theaon exists somehow (like thalassaon), but the regular Attic genitive plural would be theon.
- the genitive attribute (ton theon) needs to be locked in

So I would say ...
'ar' eisin hai kalai boylai philai tais ton theon psychais;' ~
αρ' εισιν αι καλαι βουλαι φιλαι ταις των θε(α)ων ψυχαις;

I left out the diacritics because I'm unsure about the accents (especially the ones around eisi).
 

Issacus Divus

H₃rḗǵs h₁n̥dʰéri diwsú
I don't have much practice with translation into Ancient Greek ... I suppose it would be better if some real expert answered that ...
I've also noticed that the text you had was some kind of dialect ... it wasn't Attic school Greek. So take my comments with some caution ...
Sorry for that! I know that Attic is the norm...the first kind of Greek I studied was Attic, I believe. But this is a study of Homeric Greek, so I’m learning it without any articles and the Epic declensions.
 

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Civis Illustris
Sorry for that! I know that Attic is the norm...the first kind of Greek I studied was Attic, I believe. But this is a study of Homeric Greek, so I’m learning it without any articles and the Epic declensions.

But Homer used articles, too ...
 

Issacus Divus

H₃rḗǵs h₁n̥dʰéri diwsú
It’s not in the book...
 

Hemo Rusticus

Lounge Lizard
Bitmap dixit:
But Homer used articles, too ...
He uses them but in a different way (as pronouns, as in Vedic):

γὰρ βασιλῆι χολωθείς 'for he, being wroth at the king,'
τὴν δ' ἐγὼ οὐ λύσω 'Her I will not ransom' Iliad 1.9 and 29

Also in the attributive (articular) way, but more deictic:
παῖδα δ' ἐμοὶ λύσαιτε φίλην, τὰ δ' ἄποινα δέχεσθαι ib. 1.20
'... and take this compensation (which I put before you)'.
 

Hemo Rusticus

Lounge Lizard
Also, used pronominally, ὁ and ἡ are given an accent.
 

Hemo Rusticus

Lounge Lizard
Geez, I didn't know they made stuff like this. Pretty cool.

I once had the idea for a Doric Greek Grammar, but even if I had had the know-how, it would've been exceedingly frivolous. What would you rather read: 90% of the corpus... or Moschus & Bion? :D
 
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