Number 11

Bitmap

Civis Illustris
Doesn't Modern Greek have the accent on the a of thea as well?
 

Issacus Divus

H₃rḗǵs h₁n̥dʰéri diwsú
6. Τις ην εν Κιλλη επι Θάλασση;
 

Issacus Divus

H₃rḗǵs h₁n̥dʰéri diwsú
Doesn't Modern Greek have the accent on the a of thea as well?

Yeah, but there’s θέα which means vision or sight.
 

Hemo Rusticus

Lounge Lizard
Homer didn't use diacritics. Aristophanes of Byzantium was the originator of these in the late third century, B.C.
I didn't say 'are given by Homer', yet the accentuation is nevertheless useful for the student to know. We could go in circles trying to outsmart each other on the matter ("Homer didn't actually write his verses, you know", etc.), but let's don't.
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member

Issacus Divus

H₃rḗǵs h₁n̥dʰéri diwsú
Of courses.
 

Issacus Divus

H₃rḗǵs h₁n̥dʰéri diwsú
Well, that’s not good, lol.
 

Bitmap

Civis Illustris
... mainly because the sentence is not on your screenshot.
 

Issacus Divus

H₃rḗǵs h₁n̥dʰéri diwsú
I can’t upload it.
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
Can you type it?
 

Issacus Divus

H₃rḗǵs h₁n̥dʰéri diwsú
6. Who was in Cilla by the sea?
 

Issacus Divus

H₃rḗǵs h₁n̥dʰéri diwsú
I assume that it’s right by the fantastical poetic dialect?
 

Bitmap

Civis Illustris
Yes, apart from the random accent on thallase, it seems right to me.
 

Issacus Divus

H₃rḗǵs h₁n̥dʰéri diwsú
Ok. I thought so. I’m moving on to the next section.
 

Iáson

Cívis Illústris
I don’t have the keyboard now but the poly tonic option is on the computer I use.
What type of computer do you have? On most of them you just go to keyboard settings or equivalent and add Greek as an option.
If you can't type them as is, try using / for acute, \ for grave, ^ for circumflex, ) ( for breathings, : for long vowels, along the lines of the Perseus input.
I know that Homeric Greek isn’t really one dialect, but it was the best looking book I found online.
What's your ultimate aim though? To read Homer? To compose authentic-looking archaic hexameter? Either way, I'm not sure how useful the book is.
Homer didn't use diacritics. Aristophanes of Byzantium was the originator of these in the late third century, B.C.
So I was actually right in being simple.
I didn't say 'are given by Homer', yet the accentuation is nevertheless useful for the student to know. We could go in circles trying to outsmart each other on the matter ("Homer didn't actually write his verses, you know", etc.), but let's don't.
Hah, I was about to say that (depending on which scholar you believe, I guess). Of course, there's also differences in spelling.
The poets did distinguish the sounds in speech which we mark with the diacritics, so I don't see that the original form of writing matters that much.
Sorry, but if you look closely at that papyrus you'll find that the author has used diacritics and punctuation... not regularly, but enough to help out the reader in certain places.
For example, the twelth line down reads ανδρωναῦμεγ᾽αριστοςέηντελαμωνιοςαιας
(Also I keep typing έστι for εισι but that’s just a careless mistake, I understand which is which. After I studied Hittite έστι looks like it should mean something else :/)
ἆρα ἡ καλὴ βουλή ἠστσι φίλη ταῖς τῶν θεῶν ψῡχαῖς;

6. Who was in Cilla by the sea?
6. Τις ην εν Κιλλη επι Θάλασση;
Does this mean 'who was by the shore, in Cilla?', or 'Who was in Cilla-by-the-sea?᾽?
Something like:
Τίς τάρ ἦν παρὰ θῖνα πολυφλοίσβοιο θαλάσσης:
ἐν Κίλλῃ, uu - uu - uu - u u - -
 

Bitmap

Civis Illustris
Sorry, but if you look closely at that papyrus you'll find that the author has used diacritics and punctuation... not regularly, but enough to help out the reader in certain places.
For example, the twelth line down reads ανδρωναῦμεγ᾽αριστοςέηντελαμωνιοςαιας
Ok, you looked very closely there :) Obviously, this was just some later papyrus (I don't know from which time) that I just copied to show the continuous script (not so much the diacritics).
Τίς τάρ ἦν παρὰ θῖνα πολυφλοίσβοιο θαλάσσης:
ἐν Κίλλῃ, uu - uu - uu - u u - -

Haha, nice! :)
 

Issacus Divus

H₃rḗǵs h₁n̥dʰéri diwsú
Ι’ve got a nice Windows PC at home. I’m using phones atm though.
 

Issacus Divus

H₃rḗǵs h₁n̥dʰéri diwsú
My goal was just to learn Ancient Greek as one learns Latin. I would’ve gone with Attic but this was what I found...it seems easier...but maybe that’s not good in the long run...

That being said, reading Homer would be great.
 

Big Horn

Active Member
I didn't say 'are given by Homer', yet the accentuation is nevertheless useful for the student to know. We could go in circles trying to outsmart each other on the matter ("Homer didn't actually write his verses, you know", etc.), but let's don't.
Samuel Butler believed that Homer wrote the Odyssey. He made an interesting case that can send some into paroxysms of anger a century later.

https://sacred-texts.com/cla/aoto/index.htm

https://www.joh.cam.ac.uk/authoress-odyssey-1897

https://kiwihellenist.blogspot.com/2018/05/authoress-odyssey.html
 
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