Oh, how the little piggies will grunt..

How would the Romans express this sentence below? (I mean in latin, of course).

"Oh, how the little piggies will grunt when they hear how the
Old Boar suffered."
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
Oh, ut grunnient porculi ubi audient quae passus sit verres vetus.
 

Cinefactus

Censor
Staff member
This is from Book 9 of Gesta Danorum by Saxo Grammaticus. I am not sure what haris means.
si suculae verris supplicium scissent: haud dubio irruptis haris afflictum absoluere properent

Slightly different tenses here (which is where all of the rest come from) Lib XI Fo XCIIII under Mors Regneri
si suculae verris supplicium scirent, haud dubio irruptis haris, afflictum absolvere proprararent
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member

Cinefactus

Censor
Staff member
Maybe I was too dogmatic. I wonder if Ragnar's last words were recorded in another chronicle, and Saxo Grammaticus copied them.
 

Cinefactus

Censor
Staff member
Yes I think the English translation comes from the Tale of Ragnar Lodbrok, which was apparently partially sourced from Saxo Grammaticus
 
http://www.perseus.tufts.edu/hopper/text?doc=Perseus:text:1999.04.0059:entry=hara

The original is rather different from the English inspired by it, but if Hermes still wants the meaning of the English rather than the original, I guess we can make the translation a bit closer to the original with respect the words used thus:

Oh, ut grunnient suculae UBI supplicium verris veteris audient.
what's the difference between CUM and UBI? could I use cum instead of ubi without losing its meaning? and by the way where can I get the gesta danorum in PDF or mobi originally in Latin?
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
Cum and ubi would be pretty much the same in this context.
 
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