Origin of "Verus amicus amore more ore re cognoscitur"

Nikolaos

schmikolaos
Staff member
Every source I find says that Vergil penned this, but I can't find out where.

Also, how does it scan? I'm having some trouble with it...

V[e-long:ppt32nxd][/e-long:ppt32nxd]r[u-short:ppt32nxd][/u-short:ppt32nxd]s [a-short:ppt32nxd][/a-short:ppt32nxd]|m[i-long:ppt32nxd][/i-long:ppt32nxd]c[u-short:ppt32nxd][/u-short:ppt32nxd]s [a-short:ppt32nxd][/a-short:ppt32nxd]|m[o-long:ppt32nxd][/o-long:ppt32nxd]r[e-short:ppt32nxd][/e-short:ppt32nxd] m[o-long:ppt32nxd][/o-long:ppt32nxd]r[e-short:ppt32nxd][/e-short:ppt32nxd] [o-long:ppt32nxd][/o-long:ppt32nxd]r[e-short:ppt32nxd][/e-short:ppt32nxd] | r[e-long:ppt32nxd][/e-long:ppt32nxd] c[o-long:ppt32nxd][/o-long:ppt32nxd]g|n[o-long:ppt32nxd][/o-long:ppt32nxd]sc[i-short:ppt32nxd][/i-short:ppt32nxd]t[u-short:ppt32nxd][/u-short:ppt32nxd]r

What am I missing here?
 

Nikolaos

schmikolaos
Staff member
That's a relief. Does anyone have any idea where this phrase came from? It looks like one person said it was by Vergil, and the whole world believed him.

I tried searching in several resources, but I can't find this line... could it be modern in origin? Whoever wrote it at least tried to make a hexameter, but failed in the end.
 

Bitmap

Civis Illustris
Nikolaos dixit:
That's a relief. Does anyone have any idea where this phrase came from? It looks like one person said it was by Vergil, and the whole world believed him.

I tried searching in several resources, but I can't find this line... could it be modern in origin? Whoever wrote it at least tried to make a hexameter, but failed in the end.
Such a play on words looks medieval to me ... I actually don't think a Roman would have found that very intriguing (I could be wrong of course, since I'm not a Roman).
I don't think this was an attempt to write an hexametre though. That would require the line to end in a proper adonius. The fact that it starts with a dactyle is not much of an implication of that.

The phrase also comes in the version "amore more ore re // iunguntur amicitiae", which makes it even more likely to me that it's medieval since it rhymes if you pronounce the -ae in amicitiae like a long e and do not elide more and ore. In that case, it's iambic by the medieval standard of stressing every second syllable (rather than having an alteration between long and short syllables):
amóre móre óre ré
iungúntur ámicíti(a)é
 
Top