Our

In everyday speech, does "our" usually feel like one or two syllables to you?

  • One

    Votes: 3 50.0%
  • Two

    Votes: 3 50.0%

  • Total voters
    6

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
I know it's traditionally considered one syllable. What I'm asking is how it actually feels like to you in practice.
 

Issacus Divus

ᛏᚱᛁᚾᚴᚱ•ᚼᛁᛘᛘᛁᚾᛋ
Feels like "ouwer", sometimes.
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
Feels like "ouwer", sometimes.
It often sounds that way to me. I use it as one syllable in poetry because that's what's usually done, and I can pronounce it in such a way that it's reduced if I want to, but otherwise it often feels like two syllables. Same goes with words like "fire", "hour", etc.
 

Issacus Divus

ᛏᚱᛁᚾᚴᚱ•ᚼᛁᛘᛘᛁᚾᛋ
Interesting to note. What do you call those words? Words with acceptable pronouncing in monosyllabic and bisyllabic manners?
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
If there's a technical term for it, I don't know it.
 

Iohannes Aurum

Technicus Auxiliarius
One syllable in music, poetry, and rapid speech, two in all other instances.
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
I wonder about the history of this word's pronunciation and that of other similar R words like "fire" etc.

"Our" is traditionally treated as one syllable in poetry, but I'm thinking that may be a survival from a time when the R wasn't syllabic. It could be that things have changed and the change hasn't been officially acknowledged yet.
 

Bitmap

Civis Illustris
I find it hard to pronounce it as a single syllable with the diphthong in there ... same with "fire". I'd speculate that the monosyllabic pronunciation comes from a time when 'our' still was pronounced with one long syllable (u: ), same for fire (i: ).
 

LCF

a.k.a. Lucifer
You can go both ways in poetry:

1: And in | our dreams | and in | our hopes

u - | u - | u - | u -

...

2:

For o | ur na | tion and | our flag

u - | u - | u - | u -
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
I know, but it's much more common as one syllable.
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
I may have seen a disyllabic "our" once or twice in Shakespeare already. (Vs. countless monosyllabic instances, of course.) There are more instances of "fire" and "hour" being disyllabic, though they're still oftener monosyllabic.
 

LCF

a.k.a. Lucifer
Yeah but Shakespeare is not the source of truth for modern English.

I know, but it's much more common as one syllable.
I don't know if common is the right word here. I would examine where the stress falls first. I would say that if the stress falls on "our", it would sound as a double. If on the other hand the stress is on the sibling word it would be mono. Needs more study.
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
Yeah but Shakespeare is not the source of truth for modern English.
No, but he's kind of the standard for "traditional poetry".
I don't know if common is the right word here. I would examine where the stress falls first. I would say that if the stress falls on "our", it would sound as a double. If on the other hand the stress is on the sibling word it would be mono. Needs more study.
That sounds possible.
 
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