p. 223 An Uncle's Love for his Nephew and Adopted Son

john abshire

Well-Known Member
Adulescens est carior mihi quam ego ipse! Atque hic non est filius meus sed ex fratre meo. Studia fratris iam diu sunt dissimillima meis. Ego vitam urbanam egi et otium petivi et, id quod quidam fortunatius putant, uxorem numquam habui. Ille, autem, haec omnia fecit: non in foro sed in agris vitam egit, parvum pecuniae accepit, uxorem pudicam duxit, duos filios habuit. Ex illo ego hunc maiorem adoptavi mihi, eduxi a parvo puero, amavi pro meo.

The young man is dearer to me than me myself. But this is not my son but he is from my brother. The daily pursuits of my brother are not very dissimiliar to mine. I lead a city life and I sought leisure and that (state) which they were seeking certain more unfortunates, I never had a wife. He, however, did all these: He spent (his) life not in the forum (or marketplace) but in the fields, he made a small wage, he married a modest wife, he had two sons. From him i adopted the elder to me, I reared a small boy, I loved as my own.

Please help with my translation. Sometimes I feel like I got it correct, for example, the first sentence. Adulescens est carior mihi quam ego ipse! "The young man is dearer to me than I am to myself." ego ipse "I myself" became "I am to myself" because I knew that was what me meant. You could also say that the verbage was already there in the first part of the sentence "is dearer to me"; so you don't have to repeat it.
Anyway, please help. thanks.

edits on bold red
 
Last edited:

cinefactus

Censor
Staff member
est carior mihi quam ego ipse: dearer to me than me myself

atque, I would translate as but
Studia fratris iam diu sunt dissimillima meis
: this means the opposite of what you translated
vitam urbanam egi egi is not moved. vitam egi means something like, I made my life
otium is more leisure than peace
I assume patant is petant: id quod = that (state) which. fortunatius is an adverb
ille is him
all the following verbs are past not present
parvum pecuinae accepit: he made a small wage
uxorem ducere = to get married. pudicam is modest in the sense of chaste
ex illo = from him
hunc maiorem = the elder
eduxi means to rear
amavi pro meo, I loved as my own.
 

john abshire

Well-Known Member
est carior mihi quam ego ipse: dearer to me than me myself

atque, I would translate as but
Studia fratris iam diu sunt dissimillima meis
: this means the opposite of what you translated
vitam urbanam egi egi is not moved. vitam egi means something like, I made my life
otium is more leisure than peace
I assume patant is petant: id quod = that (state) which. fortunatius is an adverb
ille is him
all the following verbs are past not present
parvum pecuinae accepit: he made a small wage
uxorem ducere = to get married. pudicam is modest in the sense of chaste
ex illo = from him
hunc maiorem = the elder
eduxi means to rear
amavi pro meo, I loved as my own.
from your editing; I edited my original post in bold red.
the translation makes more sense now.
this one: Studia fratris iam diu sunt dissimillima meis: this means the opposite of what you translated. my corrected translation="The daily pursuits of my brother are now very dissimilar to mine." before the correction; I mistyped "now" as "not", originally it read "not dissimilar".
thank you
 

cinefactus

Censor
Staff member
iam diu means for a long time

egi is past, not present

and that (state) which they were seeking certain more unfortunates, I never had a wife doesn't make sense

if it is putant it is
that (state) which some consider more fortunate
uxorem pudicam I would translate as, a chaste wife
adoptavi mihi I adopted for myself
eduxi a parvo puero I raised him from a small boy
 
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