Pater Hannibális?

Gregorius Textor

Civis Illustris

  • Civis Illustris

-- William G. Most, Latin by the Natural Method, First Year (3rd ed., 1964), p. 24.

L&S shows me: Hannĭbal (Annibal), ălis (ālis, Enn. Sat. 14 Vahl.), = Ἀννίβας [Phoen.]

I take it that Hanníbalis is the more common accentuation, though Hannibális is licensed by the "ālis, Enn. Sat. 14 Vahl."?

And would Hanníbalis be more common for ecclesiastical as well as classical pronunciation?
 

Gregorius Textor

Civis Illustris

  • Civis Illustris

I guess this would have been better placed in "Pronuciation." "Pronunciation."

(Edit Oct. 6, 2021: spelling correction.)
 
Last edited:

Matthaeus

Vemortuicida strenuus

  • Civis Illustris

  • Patronus

I've always thought the second a is short, so the i is accented.
 

Dumnorix

New Member

And, as far as the question about ecclesiastical vs classical, although the letter sounds may vary, the syllable accented will always be the same in both systems, correct?
 

Hector

New Member

I don't know the Ecclesiastical Latin pronunciation of Hannibalis, but Italian Annibale has antepenult stress, so I'd guess that Hanníbalis is preferred in Ecclesiastical Latin.

And, as far as the question about ecclesiastical vs classical, although the letter sounds may vary, the syllable accented will always be the same in both systems, correct?
That's true for almost all words, but there might be some exceptions. Abstract nouns ending in -ia taken from Greek nouns ending in -ία, such as philosophia (discussed previously) are often pronounced with penultimate stress in Ecclesiastical Latin even though the accented penult vowel in Greek is short, and so the Classical Latin stress rule would give antepenult stress.
 
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