Personal Motto - Less Bollocks, More Balls

For speakers of North American English, some context. 'Bollocks' in "English" English (as spoken in England and some Commonwealth countries), has a dual meaning. It can mean the same thing as 'balls' in the sense of 'testicles' but also has a secondary meaning not dissimilar to 'nonsense' or 'bulls%$t,' as in the phrase 'He's talking bollocks.' (In addition, it is also used as an expletive when one has an unpleasant occurrence happen, similarly to shouting 's%%t' or expressing exasperation.) The meaning of 'balls' I believe is similar across all Englishes, meaning not only 'testicles' but also 'courage' or 'fortitude.' The phrase thus means 'less nonsense/bulls&%t, more "manliness"', not dissimilar to saying 'less talk, more action.'

The English obviously has an element of wordplay and double entendre, which may be somewhat challenging to render into Latin, but I am hoping that more experienced scholars - I only have two semesters of Latin as a non-graded elective, so my first inkling is to play around with 'pestis' and 'testes' - might come up with something similarly (if not equally) creative.

Please let me know your thoughts.
 

Adrian

Civis Illustris
Your request cannot be directly translated into latin.
I was thinking of minus garriendi, plus agendi - less prattling , more doing.
or
minus gerrarum, plus audentiae - less nonsense, more courage.
 
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Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
minus garriendi, plus agendi - less prattling , more doing.
That makes sense in theory, but I wonder if gerunds are ever found in the partitive genitive.
I don't think you can come up with any literal translation that wouldn't sound like "less testicles, more scrotum".
The word colei can mean "balls" in the same figurative sense as the English, but unfortunately no synonym can mean "bollocks" in the sense of "bullshit".
 

Laurentius

Man of Culture
The word colei can mean "balls" in the same figurative sense as the English, but unfortunately no synonym can mean "bollocks" in the sense of "bullshit".
I see and you are right, oddly L&S gives and example but not a figurative translation, simply listing it under "scrotum". Still I am not 100% sure that it would work for this context and perhaps it'd be understood as someone with an excessive number of gonads. But perhaps the concept is not too distant to be understandable.
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
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