Postquam...

sindylayman

New Member
Greetings to all of you! Happy to be a part of this forum.
I've been doing a research on some of the Roman empire. Therefore it's been somehow unusual for me to read something about Cesar's visit to Efes. It seemed like he had some relatives there, or he has visited the place in the company of theirs. I've been learning Latin on my own, due to its earlier range of speaking, but I still have some doubts.

Caesar cum suo fratre ad Ephesum advenit et morati sunt.

I am confused about this: is it possible that his relative was from Efes? "Ad Ephesum" part really made me struggle.

I'd be honored if you helped me realize.
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
"Caesar came to Ephesus with his brother and they stayed (there)."

The Latin is a bit weird, by the way. Where does it come from?
 

sindylayman

New Member
Thank you. I've been also thinking about this option, but had some doubts.
It's a book from the local library - Caesar et amici - Culture (the writer is a university teacher and wrote it for the students)
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
Usually you'd say Ephesum without ad, because the classical rule is that names of towns, cities and small islands usually don't take prepositions, but the bare accusative to signify motion toward (e.g. Ephesum instead of ad Ephesum), the bare ablative to signify motion from (e.g. Epheso instead of ex Epheso) and the locative to signify location (e.g. Ephesi instead of in Epheso).
 

Agrippa

Civis Illustris
„ad Ephesum“: I‘d prefer „to the vicinity of Ephesus“. Weird, indeed, or nothing but imperfect Latin.
 
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Agrippa

Civis Illustris
There is another problem arising from "Caesar cum suo fratre": This Caesar cannot be the well-known dictator C. Iulius Caesar (100-44), who had only to sisters: Iulia minor and Iulia maior. For further information please consult Lewis&Short s. v. Caesar:
a cognomen in the gens Julia. Of these the most celebrated, C.Julius Caesar, distinguished as general, orator, statesman, and author, was assassinated by Brutus and Cassius, B.C. 44. After him all the emperors bore the name Caesar, with the title Augustus, until, under Adrian, this difference arose: Augustus designated the ruling emperor; Caesar, the heir to the throne, the crown-prince.
 

sindylayman

New Member
And that makes me have no more doubts; once I started to work on the text and before I asked you here, I googled it hoping I'd see something more about it. But there was none.

I now find that it might be just for the story or an example, but don't truly understand why would someone do it in that purpose, when someone might be researching and by that be on a wrong track.
 

Agrippa

Civis Illustris
Yes, he did; cf. Suet. Aug. 86, 1.
 
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