Pugio Bruti- bottom of p.38

john abshire

Well-Known Member
Vinum illi super tunicam effusum est, tum pugio illi ablatus est.
Illi.......illi?

Ignoring the first illi-
“Wine was spilt over her tunic, then a dagger was stolen from her.
??
Edits in bold
 
Last edited:

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
Looks like you got ablatus confused with adlatus/allatus.

Regarding the first illi, take a look here, especially section 2.
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member

john abshire

Well-Known Member
Thanks
Pura tunica indutus Clodius foras egressus est.
It seems that indutus should be induta (with a macron over the a) to make an ablative absolute “with a clean tunic having been put on.....”
But it doesn’t.
How does indutus fit into the translation?
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
It refers to Clodius, literally "having been clothed with a clean tunic".
 

john abshire

Well-Known Member
It refers to Clodius, literally "having been clothed with a clean tunic".
After I posted this I saw that induo can mean “I dress” (also); and that indutus refers to clodius; and was hoping this would translate as “Clodius, having been dressed with a clean tunic...”
Thanks!
 
Top