pugio bruti xLii

john abshire

Well-Known Member
Adulescens abiit. Clodius manibus ventri impositis in via stabat. cum venter maxime doleret, pugionem quaerere non iam volebat. Ad Portam Capenam ire nolebat. Circumspexit. Locum bene noverat. Cum non longe a Porta Capena iam esset, eo perrexit. Ubi ad Viam Appiam venit, constitit.
Multi aderant homines, multi mendici. Mendici placebant; ipse enim mendicus olim fuerat. Illud autem non placebat quod tam multi eodem loco erant et quod mendici qui ad Portam Capenam erant unum tantum deum esse putabant.


The young man went away. Clodius with his hands placed on his belly stood in the road. Since his belly was hurting a lot he did not want to search for the dagger now. He did not want to go to the Capena Gate. He looked around. He did not know the place well. Since he was not far away from the Capena Gate anymore he continued on to there. When he came to the Appiam Way he stopped.
They went were many men, many beggars. The beggars were pleasing (he liked the beggars); for he himself had been a beggar once. However that (one thing) did not please him that so many men were in the same place and that the beggars who were at the Capena Gate were thinking that there was only one god.

Please review my translation
I especially need help with the second paragraph.
Thanks
Edits are in boldface type
 
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Bitmap

Civis Illustris
Since his belly was hurting a lot (maxime)
He was learning did not know the place well
Since he was not far away from the Capena Gate anymore (iam)
They went toward There were many men, many beggars.
The beggars were not pleased
The beggars were pleasing = he liked the beggars.

However that man was not pleased
illud is neuter
illud ... quod = that thing ... which, that fact ... that

However, that one thing did not please him: that there were so many (beggars) in the same place and that the beggars ... (rest is right)
[I tried indenting the paragraphs, but it wouldn't save indented.]
It
works​
for​
me.​
 

john abshire

Well-Known Member
The beggars were pleasing = he liked the beggars.



illud is neuter
illud ... quod = that thing ... which, that fact ... that

However, that one thing did not please him: that there were so many (beggars) in the same place and that the beggars ... (rest is right)


It
works​
for​
me.​
Edits are in bold.
thanks
and
Indenting
Works
Sometimes
But not when I save it (and, indenting, works, sometimes, are indented, but not when I preview or save it.) do you have any suggestions?
A
B
A and B are indented, but not on preview or save
 
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john abshire

Well-Known Member
The beggars were pleasing = he liked the beggars.



illud is neuter
illud ... quod = that thing ... which, that fact ... that

However, that one thing did not please him: that there were so many (beggars) in the same place and that the beggars ... (rest is right)


It
works​
for​
me.​
There were many men
Multi aderant homines
How do you get “there were” from aderant ?
erant
I can see, but aderant ? My mistake—-
——aderant is the imperfect of adsum (my mistake)
I thought aderant was the imperfect of adeo
 
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john abshire

Well-Known Member
Unum deum! Intelligere non poterat cur Iuppiter aut Mars eos non percussisset. Tum in mentem venit Iovem et Martem hoc iam fecisse- mendici enim erant. Quamquam ipse fortasse speciem mendici praebere solebat puriores tamen tunicas gerebat quam mendici. Statem ventrem magnum et tunicam flavam intuitus est. Rubra erat maculis veni. Iam non multo purior erat quam mendici, sed purior esse solebat.

Clodius ad Portam Capenam adulescentem qui pugionem abstulerat diu oculis quaesivit. Multos homines pulchros, multos homines capillo nigro, multos homines tunica flava multos homines parvis manibus vidit sed neminem vidit flava tunica indutum, capillo nigro, manibus parvis.
Paulo post ad senem accessit mendicum ad Viam Appiam sedentem. Iuxta eum in via consedit et, "Salve," inquit, "solesne hic sedere?"
"Salve et tu! Soleo," inquit mendicus, "quid ad te?"
Tum Clodius: "Adulescentem quaero quem ad Portam Capenam venire solere audivi. Potesne me adiuvare?"

________________________________________________________
One god! He was not able to understand why Juppiter or Mars had not struck them. Then it came to mind Juppiter and Mars had done this already- for they were beggars. Although he himself was perhaps accustomed to passing as the appearance of a beggar, still he was wearing cleaner tunics than that of the beggars. At once, he looked at the large belly and yellow tunic. It was red with stains of wine. It was not much cleaner than (that) of a beggar but it was accustomed to be cleaner.

Clodius looked with his eyes for a long time at the Capena Gate for the young man who stole the dagger. He saw many beautiful men, many men with black hair, many men with a yellow tunic, many men with small hands, but he saw nobody with black hair, small hands and having put on a yellow tunic.
A little after, he walked up to an old man, a beggar sitting at the Appiam Way. He sat down next to him in the road and said, "Hello," "Do you sit here often?"
"Hello to you!" said the beggar, "Yes, i am accustomed (to sitting here). What is it to you?"
Then Clodius: "I am searching for a young man who I heard often comes to Gate Capena. Can you help me?"

Please review-
the bold print is especially troublesome.
thanks
Edits in bold
 
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Bitmap

Civis Illustris
Unam deum!
unum deum
There are other typos, but I won't correct them.

Jove and Mar
Jove/Jupiter and Mars

Clodius looked with his eyes for a long time at the Capena Gate for the young man who stole the dagger.
de oculis is part of the relative clause.

He saw many beautiful men, many men with black hair
Where does it say that?
"Hello to you!" said the beggar, "what to you?"
quid ad te = "How/Why is that your business?/ Why would you care?/ How is that important to you" ... or simply "Why do you ask?"

The rest seems good to me.
 

john abshire

Well-Known Member
unum deum
There are other typos, but I won't correct them.



Jove/Jupiter and Mars



de oculis is part of the relative clause.



Where does it say that?


quid ad te = "How/Why is that your business?/ Why would you care?/ How is that important to you" ... or simply "Why do you ask?"

The rest seems good to me.
I corrected my mistakes in the post, in bold. I left out a passage, plus typos. Sorry I have been doing better, but was in a hurry this morning.
soleo quid ad te. Adding soleo doesn’t help much, but it is part of the sentence. “I am accustomed to you how?” Or/ “how am I accustomed to you?”/ “how do I know you?”
??
 

PFamilias

New Member
I corrected my mistakes in the post, in bold. I left out a passage, plus typos. Sorry I have been doing better, but was in a hurry this morning.
soleo quid ad te. Adding soleo doesn’t help much, but it is part of the sentence. “I am accustomed to you how?” Or/ “how am I accustomed to you?”/ “how do I know you?”
??
"Soleo" and "quid ad te" are separate clauses. Could be written thus:

"Soleo, quid ad te?"

or

"Soleo. Quid ad te?"

or

"Soleo; quid ad te?"
 

Cinefactus

Censor
Staff member
Soleo is the reply to solesne. You could translate it as, "Yes"
quid ad te—what's it to you
 

PFamilias

New Member
How does it translate?
"Soleo" is a response to the question, "Solesne hic sedere?". In the response, "hic sedere" is understood.

So if we rewrite it, "Soleo [hic sedere]. Quid ad te?", using Bitmap's explanation of "quid ad te", does that help you figure it out?

Edit: see Cinefactus' response. ;)
 

john abshire

Well-Known Member
"nihil hercle," respondit senex, "de adulescente scio qui pugionem feminae abstulerit. Audivi autem aliquem Augusto ipsi pugionem abstulisse!"
"Hoc scire," inquit Clodius, "me non multum adiuvat. Bene autem fecisti quod me adiuvare conatus es." Nummum e sacculo suo promptum seni dedit et de via surrexit.

The old man replied, "I know nothing really concerning the young man who has stolen the dagger of the woman. However, I heard someone had stolen a dagger from Augustus himself!"
Clodius said, "To know this does not help me much. However, you did well because you tried to help me. He gave a coin (having been) taken out of his sack to the old man and he rose up from the road.

please review
I think this is ok?
thanks

Edits in bold
 
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john abshire

Well-Known Member
"Soleo" is a response to the question, "Solesne hic sedere?". In the response, "hic sedere" is understood.

So if we rewrite it, "Soleo [hic sedere]. Quid ad te?", using Bitmap's explanation of "quid ad te", does that help you figure it out?

Edit: see Cinefactus' response. ;)
Yes
Soleo, quid ad te = “yes, I am accustomed (to sitting here), what’s it to you?”
 
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