pugio bruti xlvii-xlviii

john abshire

Well-Known Member
Clodius ad mensam iuxta adulescentem pulchrum sedebat. Cum autem proximus adulescenti sederet, eum intueri nolebat, itaque suum vini poculum intuitus est. Sed nimis diu poculum intuitus est. Oeneus enim caupo ad mensam eius mox accessit et, "Omnia," rogavit, "bene? Malumne est vinum? Nihil hercle de vino scis! Hoc est optimum vinum! Pater meus fecit. Abi in malam rem cum tunica tua flava!"
Clodius e poculo in Oeneum suspexit.
"omnia," inquit, "bene. Vinum non malum est, immo optimum est. Cur mihi hic sedenti sic clamas?"

"Subiratus," inquit Oeneus, "esse videbaris, nihil enim aliud iam diu intueris quam poculum tuum, quasi vinum malum sit."
"Nihil est," respondit Clodius, "mecum tacitus loquebar." Cui Oeneus subridens, "cave," inquit, "cum homine malo loqueris." Oeneus non abiit sed ad mensam paulisper stetit et, "Ecce," inquit, "adest ille quem quaeris. Proximus tibi sedet!" Clodius rursus suspexit et: " Iam scio." Caupo adnuit, tum Clodius poculo vini sumpto bibere perrexit. Oeneus nummis e mensa sumptis conversus abiit.

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Clodius sat down at the table next to the beautiful young man.
Although he sat down next to the young man, he did not want to watch him, therefore he looked at his cup of wine. But he watched the cup for too long. For Oeneus soon walked up to his table and asked, "(Is) all well? Is the wine bad? You know really nothing about wine! This is the best wine! My father made (it). You go to hell with your yellow tunic!"
Clodius looked up at Oeneus from (his) cup.
He said, "All (is) well. The wine is not bad, in fact it is good. Why are you sitting here with me shouting in this way?"

Oeneus said, "you seemed to be somewhat angry, for a long time now you were watching nothing other than your cup, as if the wine is bad.
Clodius replied, “It is nothing. I was talking with myself quietly.”
To which Oeneus smiled and said, "beware, you are speaking with a bad man." Oeneus did not leave but stayed at the table for a little while and said "Look, he that you are searching for is here. He is sitting close to you!" Clodius looked up again and (said): I already know." The innkeeper nodded, then Clodius having took up his cup of wine he continued to drink. Having taken the coins from the table, Oeneus turned around and left.

please review,
the bold print especially
thank you
Edits in bold
 
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Cinefactus

Censor
Staff member
looked up at Oeneus
Oenus is the innkeeper, he didn't ask the innkeeper
You know nothing about wine
hic sedenti goes with mini
Nihil est It is nothing
mecum tacitus loquebar I was talking mecum tacitus—Tacitus is being used where we would use an adverb.
cum homine malo loqueris Cum can't be by a bad man, it is with a bad man. loqueris is not passive, it is deponent.
adest is here rather than near.
 

Cinefactus

Censor
Staff member
because of the way that the ablative absolute works, Latin swaps the subject around. The English way of expressing it would be, "Having taken the coins from the table, Oenus turned around and left".
 

Cinefactus

Censor
Staff member
Oeneus enim caupo
for the innkeeper Oeneus
The second last sentence is also an ablative absolute:
Then Clodius picked up his goblet of wine and continued to drink.

How would you translate?
He drew his sword and killed the enemy.
 
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john abshire

Well-Known Member
Oeneus enim caupo
for the innkeeper Oeneus
The second last sentence is also an ablative absolute:
Then Clodius picked up his goblet of wine and continued to drink.

How would you translate?
He drew his sword and killed the enemy.
He drew his sword and killed the enemy.
Gladium suum stinxit et hostes interfecit.
Or/
Gladio suo stricto hostes interfecit.
With his sword having been drawn he killed the enemy.”
Or just/
Gladio stricto hostes interfecit.
(which is what I think you are after.)
 

john abshire

Well-Known Member
Adulescens enim viis ibat quibus Clodius numquam ierat. Iam ingressi sunt parvam viam quae tam obscura erat ut iam nox esse videretur, quamquam dies erat et sol lucebat. Via hominibus et cauponis vacua erat.
Subito adulescens conversus rogavit: "Heus tu! Sequerisne me?"
Adulescens iratus Clodium intuebatur; Clodius non respondit se constitit.
Rursus adulescens: "Heus, heus, tibi dico! Sepuerisne me? Vide quid agas!"
Clodius adnuit.
"Quid malam," inquit adulescens, "me vis?"


For the young man went by roads by which Clodius had never gone. They now entered a small road which was so dark it seemed to be night already, although it was day and the sun was shining. the road was empty with people and inns.
Suddenly the young man turned and asked: "Hey you! Why are you following me?" [if correct, why is there not a cur in the Latin]
The angry young man looked at Clodius; Clodius did not reply but he did stop.
Again the angry man (said): "Hey, Hey, I say to you! (why) are you following me? Look what you do!
Clodius nodded.
the young man said, "What bad do you want from me?"

please review.
especially the bold print.
thank you
 

Cinefactus

Censor
Staff member
Only had time to look at the first couple of sentences.
ibat is imperfect. It is what was going on when they entered the small road.
the ablative in hominibus and cauponis goes with vacua. In English we would use "of"

BTW quid malum means something like "ωTF", which the board software wants to render as, "What in the world"
 
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Cinefactus

Censor
Staff member
Why are you following me?" [if correct, why is there not a cur in the Latin]
It is, "Are you following me"

Again the angry man
No angry in the Latin

Look what you do
Watch what you are doing / Take care with what you are doing.

I say to you!
I would have said, "I am talking to you"

"What bad do you want from me?"
Not from me, but "Why TF do you want me?"
 

john abshire

Well-Known Member
Only had time to look at the first couple of sentences.
ibat is imperfect. It is what was going on when they entered the small road.
the ablative in hominibus and cauponis goes with vacua. In English we would use "of"

BTW quid malum means something like "ωTF", which the board software wants to render as, "What in the world"
I got that ibat is imperfect, but that was how I translated it; “the young man went...” it may have been better to say “the young man was going by roads by which clodius had never gone.”?
vacua almost has to modify via, the a’s are both short. So the road was vacant. I could not think of anything else but “the road was vacant in/ with men and inns.”?
are you saying “In English we would use “of” in place of “in/with”? As in “vacant of men and inns”?
quid malum me vis = quid malum do you want me?
(I see what you mean, w,t,f was rendered as what in the world.)
 

Cinefactus

Censor
Staff member
For the young man was going...

the road was empty of people...

More why are you after me, rather than what.

I think quid malum is a bit harsher than what in the world, for which I would use quidnam gentium
 
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