Pugio Bruti XVII

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
Then she realized she was there once with her father.
Better: she had been there.
Wrong verb. You got confused with another deponent verb, sequor.
For one man had fled from the servants of her father
Una, being feminine, can't possibly mean one man, which would be masculine. Una e = "one of".
the daughter of Terentia
Nope. That would be Terentiae filia. You made the same mistake here as with Lucius the ass earlier.
had asked the short man that he find the servant for him.
That is literally correct. However, in English, you would more usually say "had asked the short man to find..."
the part in bold type, from sibi, I tried to get "to himself" to fit and couldn't, settling on "for him". Is this correct?
Yes.
 
Last edited:

john abshire

Well-Known Member
Better: she had been there.

Wrong verb. You got confused with another deponent verb, sequor.

Una
, being feminine, can't possibly mean one man, which would be masculine. Una e = "one of".

Nope. That would be Terentiae filia. You made the same mistake here as with Lucius the ass earlier.

That is literally correct. However, in English, you would more usually say "had asked the short man to find..."

Yes.
Una enim e patris ancillis fugerat:
For one of the servants of (her) father had fled?
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
Yes.
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
And if I remember correctly, “one of the servants of her father” can also be;
Una ancillarum patris
Yes.
Is the construction e, ex ablative genitive used when there would otherwise be two genitives in a row, as in the above?
Not necessarily, as far as I know, except, I guess, when it would cause ambiguity, but there is none when the second genitive is in the singular like patris.
 
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