Pugio Bruti xxviii

john abshire

Well-Known Member
Post ianum erant tenebrae. Terentia in parvo conclavi obscuro iam stabat. Conclave erat rubrum. Ante Terentia erat alia ianua et iuxta eam etiam aliae ianuae. Subito una ex iis aperta est et parva femina conclave intravit. Ad Terentiam accesit et tacita eam diu intuita est.

past the door there was darkness. Terentia was now standing in a small dark room. The room was red. Before Terentia was another door and next to her were also other doors. Suddenly one of them opened and a small woman entered the room. She walked towards Terentia and she quietly watched her for a long time.
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Edits in bold
 
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Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
Iam would probably better translate as "now" here.

Ante = before.

"... next to her were also other doors" (better grammar, with agreement between the verb and plural subject)

Are you sure that the construction una ex eis doesn't ring a bell for you? You've come across similar ones twice in recent days.

For the rest, good job.
 
Is "in parvo conclave obscuro" good Latin? I'm not keen on the use of two adjectives here. A conjunction seems needed.
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
Is "in parvo conclave obscuro" good Latin? I'm not keen on the use of two adjectives here. A conjunction seems needed.
I guess you can't say that it's really, really wrong but I think it would indeed be better, or at least more usual, with a conjunction.
 

john abshire

Well-Known Member
Are you sure that the construction una ex eis doesn't ring a bell for you? You've come across similar ones twice in recent days.
Una ex iis “one of them” (must be)
[For iis all I could think of was eo 2nd person perfect tense, but I think now iisti.] Maybe now I will think of e,ex being like a genitive.
Thanks
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
Ah, so what confused you was iis (alternate form of eis) rather than the whole construction. I see.

"One of them" is correct.
 

john abshire

Well-Known Member
“Salve,” inquit Terentia.
Tum ursula- hoc enim nomen feminae fuit- rogavit: “quid? Vin’ Clodium videre?”
Terentia nesciebat quis clodius esset sed intellexit eundem esse debere qui patrem multo ante adiuvisset.


“Hello”, said Terentia
Then Ursula-for this was the name of the woman-asked: “what? Do you want to see Clodius?”
Terentia did not know who clodius was but she understood he ought to be the same one who had helped her father long before.
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Edits
 
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Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
Vin is a colloquial contraction of visne (vis from volo + the interrogative enclitic -ne).

"who had helped her father much before" is a little ambiguous. Without the original, I think I would have read "much" as modifying "helped" (as in "the man had helped her father much"). Multo in the Latin however modifies with ante, and you could convey this more clearly by saying "(a) long (time) before".
 
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