pugio bruti xxx

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
No, it is not correct.
 
Last edited:

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
Yes, that is literally correct. You could turn it into "he said to Terentia as she told her story" or "as Terentia told her story, he said to her".
 

john abshire

Well-Known Member
Yes, that is literally correct. You could turn it into "he said to Terentia as she told her story" or "as Terentia told her story, he said to her".
Terentiae narranti in dative, Clodius speaking ”to Terentia” makes sense, but “to Terentia telling her story” there seems to be too much implied. Is this common?
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
Terentiae narranti in dative, Clodius speaking ”to Terentia” makes sense, but “to Terentia telling her story” there seems to be too much implied.
Narro means to tell, but in English you can't very well say just "she told" without any object or the like, that's why I added "her story".
Is this common?
Hm, yes. It isn't rare that some more words are needed in English compared to Latin.
 

john abshire

Well-Known Member
Narro means to tell, but in English you can't very well say just "she told" without any object or the like, that's why I added "her story".

Hm, yes. It isn't rare that some more words are needed in English compared to Latin.
It makes sense in a general sense that one language says more in fewer words than the other. However that is not what i meant.
Clodius manum ventri magno imposuit et Terentiae narranti, “quid”, inquit, “malum, narras?!”
I think that the words in dative case may imply quite a bit more
Clodius put his hand on his large belly, and said to Terentia (while she was) telling (her story), “what? What are you saying?”

would it be correct to add all this, specifically the "while"?
(only the words in paratheses are added)
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
Yes, it would be correct.
 
Top