Pugio Bruti xxxiv

john abshire

Well-Known Member
“Clodi,” inquit Terentia, “vinum super tunicam tibi effudisti.”
“Scio,” inquit clodius. “Lucetne mihi tuum vinum bibere?”
Tum subridens, “abibo,” inquit Terentia.
Et clodius: “bene, ego pugionem tuum quareram.”
Tum Terentia: “optime! Vale!”
Terentia surrexit et ad ianuam se convertit, et, “parvis erat,” inquit “manibus”


Terentia said, “clodius, you spilt wine over your tunic.”
“I know,” said clodius. “does it shine for me to drink your wine?
then smiling Terentia said, “I will go”
And clodius (said): “well, I will search for your dagger.”
Then Terentia (said): “great! Goodbye!”
Terentia rose up and turned to the door herself and said, “He was with small hands.”
??
My main questions are underlined
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
“I know,” said clodius. “does it shine for me to drink your wine?
I'm pretty sure it should be saying licet rather than lucet.
More like "good", I'd say. "Well" has a somewhat different meaning in English when used as in your translation.
turned to the door herself
Your translation suggests a nominative meaning for "herself" (as in "she herself, in person"), but se can't be nominative. The meaning of the Latin is rather "turned herself to the door", where "herself" is the object of "turned". This object, while required in Latin, is unnecessary in English, though, and you can just say "turned to the door", without the "herself".
He was with small hands.”
That is literally correct. For better English you could say "He had small hands".
 

john abshire

Well-Known Member
I'm pretty sure it should be saying licet rather than lucet.

More like "good", I'd say. "Well" has a somewhat different meaning in English when used as in your translation.

Your translation suggests a nominative meaning for "herself" (as in "she herself, in person"), but se can't be nominative. The meaning of the Latin is rather "turned herself to the door", where "herself" is the object of "turned". This object, while required in Latin, is unnecessary in English, though, and you can just say "turned to the door", without the "herself".

That is literally correct. For better English you could say "He had small hands".
It is licet. (I worried forever trying to fit in “he shines” and “to drink wine”)
Se accusative makes sense, also
Parvis erat manibus ; is there a reason why this is not parvis manibus habet?
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
is there a reason why this is not parvis manibus habet?
A very good reason: parvis manibus habet is ungrammatical. However, you could have had parvas manus habet. That you have parvis erat manibus instead is the choice of the author. I remember a similar phrase being used earlier, when someone described a young man to Terentia. The author presumably wanted to echo it here. As this book seems to be designed for Latin students, I also think the author's choice was influenced by a desire to introduce the ablative of quality.
 

john abshire

Well-Known Member
A very good reason: parvis manibus habet is ungrammatical. However, you could have had parvas manus habet. That you have parvis erat manibus instead is the choice of the author. I remember a similar phrase being used earlier, when someone described a young man to Terentia. The author presumably wanted to echo it here. As this book seems to be designed for Latin students, I also think the author's choice was influenced by a desire to introduce the ablative of quality.
Yes, parvas manus habet is what I meant. (Oftentimes You have to go by what I mean.)
 

john abshire

Well-Known Member
Terentia adnuit et e conclavi egressa est. Post se Terentia clodium de vino effuso clamantem audivit.
Terentia nodded and went out of the room. Afterward Terentia listened to Claudius shouting about spilling wine on himself.
??
The last sentence. If this translation is correct; it seems that it should be some type of indirect statement, with corresponding modification to verbs?
 

Bitmap

Civis Illustris
Afterward Terentia listened to Claudius shouting about spilling wine on himself.
post se = Behind her
audivit -- better to write "heard" than "listened to" in this context
It doesn't say "on himself" anywhere. She heard him shouting/complaining about spilt wine.
 
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