Pugio Bruti xxxix

john abshire

Well-Known Member
Non longe a caupona ’Asina’ aberat sed Porta Capenam ei non placebat; tam multi homines ad Portam Capenam erant, et amplius vini volebat. Itaque mansit et vinum bibit.

He was not far from the Asina Inn but to him the Capena Gate was not pleasing; so many people were at the Capena Gate, and he wanted more wine. Therefore, he stayed and he drank wine.

is this translation correct?
amplius vini
in the dictionary; amplius is an adverb.
I found plus is “more”, an adjective, and also a neuter noun, where “more wine” would be plus vivi, where vinum is in the genitive, vini as it is here with amplius.
is amplius vini correct for “more wine” , is amplius an adverb only, or is it also an adjective, and/ noun?
Edits in bold
 
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Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
Look up absum. It doesn't mean "to go".
tam multi homines ad Portam Capenam erant,
You forgot this part.
is this translation correct?
amplius vini
in the dictionary; amplius is an adverb.
I found plus is “more”, an adjective, and also a neuter noun, where “more wine” would be plus vivi, where vinum is in the genitive, vini as it is here with amplius.
is amplius vini correct for “more wine” , is amplius an adverb only, or is it also an adjective, and/ noun?
Just like plus, amplius can be an adjective, an adverb or a noun. Here it's a noun.
 

john abshire

Well-Known Member
Look up absum. It doesn't mean "to go".

You forgot this part.
Just like plus, amplius can be an adjective, an adverb or a noun. Here it's a noun.
I confused aberat as being derived from abeo instead of absum.
i made this and the other corrections in bold.
Thanks
 

john abshire

Well-Known Member
Poculum posuit, sed mensa non iam erat ubi paulo ante fuerat, et Clodius imprudens omne vinum sibi super ventrem effudit.
Exclamavit: “O mensa scelestissima, abin’ in malam rem?” Surrexit de e caupona iratus egressus est.


He put down the cup, but the table was no longer were it had been a little before, and Clodius carelessly spilt all the wine over his belly.
He exclaimed: “O most crooked table, you go to hell?” He got up from the chair and angry he walked out of the inn.

Please check the translation., and;
The bold
?
Thanks
Corrections are in bold
 
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Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
He positioned a cup
It's probably more like "he put down the (or his) cup".
but it was not on the table already were it had been before
There is no "on" before mensa. Mensa is the subject.

Non iam = no longer.

You forgot paulo.
Clodius carelessly spilt wine all over his belly.
Omne agrees with vinum.
abin’ in malam rem?
Abin' is a colloquial contraction of abisne, that is abis + -ne.

Abire in malam rem, literally "to go into the bad thing", is an idiom roughly equivalent to "to go to hell".
Surrexit de
I take it you left out something like sede or sella here.
he left out of the inn
That's not quite correct English, methinks. Maybe you hesitated between "he left the inn" and "he walked out of the inn" and got stranded between the two.
 

john abshire

Well-Known Member
It's probably more like "he put down the (or his) cup".

There is no "on" before mensa. Mensa is the subject.
Mensa has a macron over the “a”, so it’s ablative, but there is no “in” in front.
I assumed “on the table”
Is this correct?
Edits in bold
 
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Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
No. The macron must be a mistake.
 

Matthaeus

Vemortuicida strenuus
btw homines is not just men, but people in general ;)
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
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