Pugio Paulo

john abshire

Well-Known Member
Paulo post Terentia dormitum iit sed dormire non poterat. Etiam irata erat. Nesciebat enim quomodo pugionem patris recuperaret. Cogitabat secum. Nihil non faciam ut patris donum recuperem; id per oculos iuro!
A little after Terentia went to bed but she could not go to sleep. Still she was angry. Indeed she did not know how to recover her father’s dagger. She pondered with herself: I will do anything to recover the gift of my father; I swear this on my eyes!
??
Edits
 
Last edited:

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
Also she was angry.
Etiam probably means "still" here.
I did not do nothing
You've got the wrong tense; faciam is future. The meaning is "[There is] nothing [that] I will not do", "I will do anything".
Oops, it says donum, not domum.
I swear this through my eyes!
Literally correct, but for better English you could say "I swear it on my eyes".
 

john abshire

Well-Known Member
Etiam probably means "still" here.

You've got the wrong tense; faciam is future. The meaning is "[There is] nothing [that] I will not do", "I will do anything".

Oops, it says donum, not domum.

Literally correct, but for better English you could say "I swear it on my eyes".
Edits are in bold
the first sentence seems weird. I figured it was supposed to be “after she went to bed she could not sleep” but I had trouble with dormitum iit. Iit must be “she went” dormitum must be the ppp of dormio and not derived from dormito. I guess “she went” “having slept/ gone to bed/ rested”? Also paulo in dictionary; paulum is indec. So how does it become Paulo?
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
Post here is an adverb, not a conjunction. That is, it's equivalent to "afterwards".

Dormitum is the accusative supine of dormio, expressing purpose after a verb of motion. Dormitum iit is literally "she went to sleep" but that translation is problematic because "to go to sleep" in English idiomatically means to fall asleep, whereas the meaning in Latin is more literal, "to go (somewhere in order) to sleep"; that's equivalent to "to go to bed".

Paulum is originally the neuter accusative of paulus, and paulo the neuter ablative. Both are used as adverbs with slightly different meanings.
 

john abshire

Well-Known Member
Post here is an adverb, not a conjunction. That is, it's equivalent to "afterwards".

Dormitum is the accusative supine of dormio, expressing purpose after a verb of motion. Dormitum iit is literally "she went to sleep" but that translation is problematic because "to go to sleep" in English idiomatically means to fall asleep, whereas the meaning in Latin is more literal, "to go (somewhere in order) to sleep"; that's equivalent to "to go to bed".

Paulum is originally the neuter accusative of paulus, and paulo the neuter ablative. Both are used as adverbs with slightly different meanings.
Thank you. And One more.
Id in the last sentence. I translated as “this”. What is the difference between hoc and Id?
 

Bitmap

Civis Illustris
Top