quōmodo nāvis in aliīs linguīs appellātur/dīcitur?

I'm writing a dictionary entry for the word 'nāvis' in Latin and need to clarify some Latin phrases I should use after the paradigm.

This is what I have written:

sententiae cum verbō 'nāvis':

֍ nāvis est vehiculum aquāticum ֍

trānslātiōnēs (quōmodo nāvis in aliīs linguīs appellātur):

anglice: ship

russice: кора́бль



Or should it be "quōmodo nāvis in aliīs linguīs dīcitur" instead of "appellātur"? Please let me know if there are other mistakes.
 
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Issacus Divus

ᛋᚢᚾᚢ ᚱᛖᛟᚱᛞᚲᚤᚾᛁᚾᚷᚨᛋ
"Quōmodo nāvis in aliīs linguīs dīcitur" sounds better, I think.
 

Bitmap

Civis Illustris
Both words work, but it should be dicatur or appelletur since it is an indirect question.
 
Both words work, but it should be dicatur or appelletur since it is an indirect question.
But there isn't main clause in the sentence, so why would it be indirect question?
And will adding a question mark at the end of the sentence fix the issue? --> "Quōmodo nāvis in aliīs linguīs dīcitur?"
 
Also, I want to ask if in the sentence "Quōmodo nāvis in aliīs linguīs dīcitur?" the preposition 'in' is necessary or not.
Can I say/write, "Quōmodo nāvis aliīs linguīs dīcitur?"
 

Bitmap

Civis Illustris
But there isn't main clause in the sentence, so why would it be indirect question?
Yes, but a main clause is implied here (something like <ea verba quae sequuntur demonstrant> quomodo ...)
You find a similar phenomenon in Latin book or story titles. They always have something like 'te narrabo' implied and are either formulated with de + ablative or as an indirect question.

And will adding a question mark at the end of the sentence fix the issue? --> "Quōmodo nāvis in aliīs linguīs dīcitur?"
Yes, that would turn it into a direct question. That would make a bit less sense to me, though, because I took the phrase as an explanation to 'translationes'.

It's essentially the same difference as in English:
translations (what 'navis' is called in other languages) --> indirect question
translations (what is 'navis' called in other languages?) --> direct question

Also, I want to ask if in the sentence "Quōmodo nāvis in aliīs linguīs dīcitur?" the preposition 'in' is necessary or not.
Can I say/write, "Quōmodo nāvis aliīs linguīs dīcitur?"
Good thing you mentioned that. You actually need to leave out the in.
 
Thank you for your explanations, Bitmap!!

Yes, that would turn it into a direct question. That would make a bit less sense to me, though, because I took the phrase as an explanation to 'translationes'.

It's essentially the same difference as in English:
translations (what 'navis' is called in other languages) --> indirect question
translations (what is 'navis' called in other languages?) --> direct question
Yes, it is explanation to trānslātiōnēs, but I am making a dictionary for beginners/intermediate-level students, and I want to limit the use of the subjunctive.

PS. To be honest, I didn't even think about the indirect/direct question issue when I wrote the phrase. For me, the question mark was implied. But I really appreciate your clarifications.
 
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I have another question:

What if the word I am translating is a person's name? For example:

trānslātiōnēs (quōmodo Iācōbus aliīs linguīs appellātur?):

anglice: James

russice: Я́ков


Is 'appellātur' or 'dīcitur' preferred in this case? Or there is no difference from the case of common nouns?
 
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Bitmap

Civis Illustris
I would prefer appellare in any case :)
 

Godmy

A Monkey
Czech: loď :)

ď (you have in Russian too) is articulated on the same place in the mouth as "j" (as in "yes") but you articulate it as a stop, putting the tongue on that upper place of the mouth completely, building up the air, then releasing (normally, this is a voiced consonant, but it gets devoiced at the end of the word typically... then it sounds identical to ť ).

"koráb" is not impossible ("á" means a long vowel) but it's rather poetic...
 
A follow-up question:
For parts of speech other than noun, how should I phrase the question? For example:
Quōmodo caecus aliīs linguīs appellātur?
Quōmodo ambulāre aliīs linguīs appellātur?
Quōmodo repente aliīs linguīs appellātur?
Quōmodo dum aliīs linguīs appellātur?
Would using 'dīcitur'
Quōmodo caecus aliīs linguīs dīcitur?
Quōmodo ambulāre aliīs linguīs dīcitur?
Quōmodo repente aliīs linguīs dīcitur?
Quōmodo dum aliīs linguīs dīcitur?
be a better option?
 
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