Qua de causa..

Adrian

Homo Romanticus
qua de causa - for this reason / for which reason/ wherefore/ therefore

[...]proximique sunt Germanis, qui trans Rhenum incolunt, quibuscum continenter bellum gerunt. Qua de causa Helvetii quoque reliquos Gallos virtute praecedunt, quod fere cotidianis proeliis cum Germanis contendunt...
they are the nearest to the Germans, who dwell beyond the Rhine, with whom they are continually waging war; for which reason the Helvetii also surpass the rest of the Gauls in valor, as they contend with the Germans in almost daily battles,


 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
Yes.
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
Yes. Re is different from causa, though.
 

Spinosus

New Member
Yes. Re is different from causa, though.
This sort of formula with the preposition sandwiched between noun and adjective, or vice versa, is very common: multis de rebus, media in urbe. The noun and adjective will be in the same case. With experience these are easy to spot, but in translating one needs to rearrange mentally (de multis rebus etc.) before translating. Much of the power of Latin comes from its brevity and force. The powerful words are nouns, verbs, adjectives and adverbs. As far as possible, unlovely structural words (prepositions, conjunctions etc.) are omitted (plain cases will often serve in place of a preposition plus noun, especially in poetry) or tucked away, as here. It is also a pleasant pattern to eye and ear.
 
This sort of formula with the preposition sandwiched between noun and adjective, or vice versa, is very common: multis de rebus, media in urbe. The noun and adjective will be in the same case. With experience these are easy to spot, but in translating one needs to rearrange mentally (de multis rebus etc.) before translating. Much of the power of Latin comes from its brevity and force. The powerful words are nouns, verbs, adjectives and adverbs. As far as possible, unlovely structural words (prepositions, conjunctions etc.) are omitted (plain cases will often serve in place of a preposition plus noun, especially in poetry) or tucked away, as here. It is also a pleasant pattern to eye and ear.
The hardest part of the language for me, it's the word order.. like a word puzzle..
 
This sort of formula with the preposition sandwiched between noun and adjective, or vice versa, is very common: multis de rebus, media in urbe. The noun and adjective will be in the same case. With experience these are easy to spot, but in translating one needs to rearrange mentally (de multis rebus etc.) before translating. Much of the power of Latin comes from its brevity and force. The powerful words are nouns, verbs, adjectives and adverbs. As far as possible, unlovely structural words (prepositions, conjunctions etc.) are omitted (plain cases will often serve in place of a preposition plus noun, especially in poetry) or tucked away, as here. It is also a pleasant pattern to eye and ear.
(..) As far as possible, unlovely structural words (prepositions, conjunctions etc.) are omitted (plain cases will often serve in place of a preposition plus noun, especially in poetry) or tucked away(..) So could you give us more examples? That's so interesting.. thanks for your comments..
 

scrabulista

Consul
Staff member
not classical but magna cum laude
 

Etaoin Shrdlu

μεσσηγυδορποχέστης
The hardest part of the language for me, it's the word order.. like a word puzzle..
Are you doing any actual Latin reading? The more familiar you become with how things are actually done, the less strange features like this will seem. If you have an interest in a particular period of Latin, you might consider starting there.
 

Etaoin Shrdlu

μεσσηγυδορποχέστης
It's hard to say, given that I don't know anything about your level of Latin or your interests. Caesar is the traditional if uninspiring choice for a first prose author; Cicero would be harder, but less boring for those not set alight by accounts of military campaigns. Do you have any interest in poetry? If not, I wouldn't recommend trying it in Latin; if you do, then it would depend on what sort of poetry attracts you. And so forth.
 
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