Quid sum? (What am I?) Latin writing game

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
Dunno, it's a star but I've never heard it called North Star.
 

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Civis Illustris
Are you George Clooney, a movie star in the film 'Three Kings' (1999)?
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
Now that's an inventive answer... I kind of like it but it's definitely not what I had in mind.

Let me make it a little more obvious:

Luce mea tres reges dona ferentes duxi.
 

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Civis Illustris
Oh! You're the star from the New Testament! (sidus :p)

That wasn't too obvious ... it doesn't say anywhere that the dudes were kings. I suppose it doesn't even say anywhere that all of them were dudes.
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
I don't remember whether they're actually called kings in the Bible, but they're traditionally portrayed as such. E.g.:

 

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Civis Illustris
I don't remember whether they're actually called kings in the Bible, but they're traditionally portrayed as such. E.g.:
I know ... I'll be Caspar on Christmas Eve :<

But the Vulgate calls them magi (I suppose it's the same word in Greek)
They are "Weise" (wise people) in German, and "wise men" in King James.
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
I know ... I'll be Caspar on Christmas Eve :<
Will you be performing a Christmas play?
But the Vulgate calls them magi (I suppose it's the same word in Greek)
They are "Weise" (wise people) in German, and "wise men" in King James.
And in French they're les Rois mages, the Magi Kings... :p
That's not up to you to decide By the rules of this game, I should have long since written my puzzle
Haha, true... I guess the rules have de facto changed, though...
 

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Civis Illustris
Will you be performing a Christmas play?
Not on my own, but I'll be part of it.

And in French they're les Rois mages, the Magi Kings... :p
They are the Three Holy Kings in German... Caspar, Melchior and Balthasar.

In Catholic areas (Austria, southern Germany and parts of west Germany around the Rhine), people paint C+M+B on other peoples' houses around Christmas time (do they also do that in Belgium?). Some also write K+M+B there (because Kaspar can be spelt with a K).

A few days ago, my mother asked me if I had any idea what CMB stood for. I said Christus Mansionem Benedicat ... and explained that it is sometimes spelt with a K, in which case it is to be taken as Kyrios ... Then she asked me "Ok, but do you know WHAT ELSE it stands for?"
I said "What are you talking about?" and she triumphantly said "The names of the three kings! Caspar, Melchior and Balthasar!"

I mean, if I know the Latin phrase, what are the chances I don't know the rest of the story? I gently reminded her that I explained the whole thing in a play some 12 years ago.

(She knew that stuff from a city tour through Zwickau she had taken one day earlier. She also gave me an explanation as to why there are only 11 and not 12 candles on a candle arch ... even though we don't have a single candle arch with 11 candles.)
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
Not on my own
I never implied that, lol.
In Catholic areas (Austria, southern Germany and parts of West Germany around the Rhine), people paint C+M+B on other peoples' houses around Christmas time (do they also do that in Belgium?).
Not that I know of.
She also gave me an explanation as to why there are only 11 and not 12 candles on a candle arch ... even though we don't have a single candle arch with 11 candles.)
Hm... What was the explanation?
And in French they're les Rois mages, the Magi Kings...
By the way, I didn't mean in the Bible.
 

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Civis Illustris
Quid sum? sum realis, sum
irrationalis;
apud quosdam hominum
sum transcendentalis.
ab n=zero gradiens
summa primae partis
(infinitum adpetens)
sum n facultatis.
inter duo et tria
infinite tendo:
laus sit tibi, Noctua,
in m'inveniendo!
 

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Civis Illustris
Excellent!
Vicipaedia calls it numerus Euleri.
 

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Civis Illustris
quid sum? indoles superba
me duorum genuit:
alter mihi dedit verba,
alter cantum addidit.
ignem memoro deorum,
unitatem hominum.
civium Europaeorum
omnium in ore sum.
 
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