Quid sum? (What am I?) Latin writing game

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
The music is the Hymn to Joy but I'm not sure the lyrics are called that too.
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
Dura de caelo cado, terrestria minutis ictibus tundo. Quid sum?
 

john abshire

Active Member
Terrestria doesn't agree with ictibus.
I presumed it would be “beating the ground with small strokes.” , but terrestris, e is an adjective (in my dictionary).
?
(Edit) Adding to confusion terrestria should be neuter plural, I think. I also couldn’t make terrestria work as an adverb. (edit again) as terrestrially.
 
Last edited:

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
Terrestria is a neuter plural adjective, here substantivized, i.e. used as a noun would be, meaning "terrestrial things".
 

john abshire

Active Member
Terrestria is a neuter plural adjective, here substantivized, i.e. used as a noun would be, meaning "terrestrial things".
I learned two things with this sentence.
An adjective can be used “on its own” to describe a noun contained in a verb (e.g. dura), and an adjective in neuter gender can be used to imply an inanimate noun, e.g. terrestria.
Thanks
 

john abshire

Active Member
Glacie et aqua moventi formor.
Videri et audiri semper non possum.
Ubi videri possum, silens aut sonorissimus sum. (Edit: changed verb to sum)
Altissimus plerumque sum.
Quid sum?

(Would someone please translate the Latin so I know it is correct)
 
Last edited:

john abshire

Active Member
Glacie et aqua moventi formor.
Videri et audiri semper non possum.
Ubi videri possum, silens aut sonorissimus sum. (Edit: changed verb to sum)
Altissimus plerumque sum.
Quid sum?

(Would someone please translate the Latin so I know it is correct)
Hint: Grandine gracieque moventi plerumque formor.
In caelo videri possum.
 
Last edited:
Top