quis haec fōrmula erat Sat 109

Cinefactus

Censor
Staff member
dux Eumolpōs et castīgātē ante vehementissimē Lichā tabulās foederis signat, quis haec fōrmula erat:

why is it quis? I would have thought it would be quid with foedus or quae with tabulas.
 

Dantius

Homo Sapiens
Staff member
I would have thought it would be quid with foedus or quae with tabulas.
Neither of these would make sense (and quid is interrogative, not relative). The foedus is not a formula, nor are the tabulae, so a nominative quod or quae wouldn't work here.
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
It's a alternative form for quibus.

By the way, I couldn't make any sense of castīgātē ante vehementissimē Lichā so I looked up the Latin Library version and that should be castigato.
 

Cinefactus

Censor
Staff member
Thanks :) I presume it should be quīs?
 

Cinefactus

Censor
Staff member
Another question:
ut tū, Tryphaēna, neque iniūriam tibi factam ā Gitōne quereris, neque sī quid ante hunc diem factum est, obiciēs vindicābisve aut ūllō aliō genere persequendum cūrābis

ut with the future indicative: Is this some kind of legal formula? ne is used like this in the 10 commandments, but I didn't know that ut could be.
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
That has to be some sort of elliptical legal formulation that I'm not familiar with, but I imagine it must be something like "[in the same way] as (i.e. if, providing) you do this and this and that [this agreement will stand]". I was unable to find any examples in L&S.

The Ten Commandments use non, not ne.
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
I have found the explanation in the OLD. It's what L&S mentions here, except that the main clause has been left implied:
The strong asseveration follows ut.

So in our passage, the parties are swearing that they will do this and this and that, implying "just as (ut) Tryphaena will do this and this and that [may the gods love her or so (and not love her if she doesn't), but this is left implied]".
 

Cinefactus

Censor
Staff member
Thanks Pacifica :)
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
You're welcome, and thanks for smiling at me. I needed it.
 
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