Quod + subj. (Erasmus)

Quasus

Civis Illustris
Domestica cōnfābulātiō

Quō noster Leonardus? — Ad tē ībam. — Istud quidem facis īnsolēns. — Quam ob rem? — Quia jam annus est, quod nōs nōn invīseris.

I’ve found an appropriate meaning of quod in OLD:
(introducing a cl. stating an event from which a period of time is reckoned) That.
iam diu est quod uentri uictum non datis Pl. Am. 302
tertius dies est, quod audiui recitantem Sentium Augurinum Plin. Ep. 4.27.1
sat pol diu est quod intermisimus te Apul. Met. 1.24

Naturally, the indicative is everywhere. (OLD says that the subjunctive occurs only if the clause depends on a subordinate clause.) Yet is there a rule to justify the use of the subjunctive by Erasmus (perhaps on account of the colloquial style), or is it a flaw of the great Latinist?

Any help is appreciated.
 

Manus Correctrix

QVAE CORRIGIT
I don’t know anything about what mood this requires, but thank you for pointing out this useful construction.
 

Adrian

Civis Illustris
I really do need to learn German, if only to perfect my Latin.
Deutsch ist nicht so schwer wie man denkt. Es ist sicherlich viel einfacher als Lateinisch. Ich kann dich versichern dass mit Rosetta Stone German wirst du alle grammatischen Grundlagen kurzzeitig verstehen und unterhalb sechs Monaten perfekte Sprachkenntnisse beherrschen.;)
 

Adrian

Civis Illustris
This is a result of using Rosetta Stone German for five months 30 minutes a day monday-friday;)
 

Nikolaos

schmikolaos
Staff member
So you were probably saying something about it not being that hard, and in fact being easier than Latin, right?

I can't afford Rosetta Stone. Or rather, I'd never forgive myself if I spent that sort of money on it :ρ
 

Adrian

Civis Illustris
Deutsch ist nicht so schwer wie man denkt. Es ist sicherlich viel einfacher als Lateinisch. Ich kann dich versichern dass mit Rosetta Stone German wirst du alle grammatischen Grundlagen kurzzeitig verstehen und unterhalb sechs Monaten perfekte Sprachkenntnisse beherrschen.;)
German is not as difficult as people think. It is surely much easier than latin. I can assure you that with Rosetta Stone German you will understand all grammatical basics in no time and in period of less than six months achieve a perfect command of language


EDIT : yes, it is expensive but effective.
 

Imber Ranae

Ranunculus Iracundus

Quasus

Civis Illustris
I concluded that that was a peculiarity of Erasmus’ Latin. This is the most obvious explanation, since no forgotten sentence by Plautus or Terence has come up.
 

Nikolaos

schmikolaos
Staff member
Continuing our unrelated discussion on German and Rosetta Stone, I just tried RS's online demo for German. You know, I think it's lying to me. There's no way that something like "möchte" can be an everyday word >_<

Consonant clusters are an obvious impediment. Not insurmountable, but very frustrating. "Möchte" itself isn't that hard to pronounce, but it certainly doesn't roll off the American tongue in phrases like "ich möchte gern". And I am well aware that there are far worse clusters than that.

Hmmm... but I hate turning down a challenge. Assuming that I get into this college with adequate funds, I might look into some German courses.
 

Akela

sum
Staff member

Manus Correctrix

QVAE CORRIGIT
Ich habe vier Jahre Deutsch in der Schule gelernt, aber ich hab’ alles vergessen.
 

Adrian

Civis Illustris
I can't afford Rosetta Stone. Or rather, I'd never forgive myself if I spent that sort of money on it :ρ
I don't know how much does it cost in USA, but in Europe a new RS German costs 200 Euro, I bougth a second hand Software from Internet bit for 100 Euro + 10 Euro delivery cost. I can assure you I do not regret a single penny spent on it.

Continuing our unrelated discussion on German and Rosetta Stone, I just tried RS's online demo for German. You know, I think it's lying to me. There's no way that something like "möchte" can be an everyday word >_<.
The modal verbs play important role in german language; mögen >> 'Ich möchte' has many use in german language. See
http://german.about.com/library/blmodalv01.htm
http://german.about.com/library/blmodalvex.htm
The demo version hasn't got all the features of the commertial version. As far as I know, corporate versions have got even more features than 'home editions'.


Die meisten Sprachen sind einfache als Lateinisch.

Ich glaube dass nicht. Deutsch ist nicht soo leicht :p
Akela, five months ago I wasn’t able to understand the difference between Katze, Hund, Die Frau, Der Man, Der Junge trinkt. Now I am able to compose sentences, converse with german students (they even say I speak with decent pronunciation), watch german TV news, read german internet articles with comprehension. IMO any language (except for latin and Classical Greek) can be taught and learned efficiently and quick if:
1) it is presented in 'simple and user friendly' way (lega: I hate Wheelock’s Latin)
2) Adept is persistent and learns systematically
3) Adept focuses not only on study material but also tries to immerge into language for example watch german TV, correspond with german speaking students, read german internet articles etc.

Ich habe vier Jahre Deutsch in der Schule gelernt, aber ich hab’ alles vergessen.
Cursor Nictans, you amaze me every time. How many languages except Latin, Greek, Spanish and German do you actually speak?
 

Manus Correctrix

QVAE CORRIGIT
Oh, I don’t know Greek. I’ll be doing it at uni next year though.
 

Nikolaos

schmikolaos
Staff member
I don't know if it's true but I was told that classical greek a lot more difficult than latin.
The little bit that I've looked into is actually easier. Or maybe it just seems easier since I've studied Latin. It just has trouble holding my interest x_x
 

Cambrinus

Civis Illustris
Quase, it may be that inviseris is perf. conj (alias subj.), because a negative statement is being made i.e. 'you have not visited us for a year'. So, as the visit has not happened, it might have seemed inappropriate to Erasmus to use the indicative.

Of course, that does not explain iam diu est quod uentri uictum non datis (Pl. Am. 302), unless tense makes the difference.
 

Quasus

Civis Illustris
Thanks four your comment, o Cambrine! :) BTW, have you ever come across a similar construction in a classic text?
 
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