Right-Hand-Man

LenCabral

Member
Hi all,

In English, the term "right-hand-(wo)man" stands in for "second-in-command," etc. Is there an analogous term in Latin? I know French allows for something like "bras droit," I wonder if the same is attested in Latin.
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
I don't know of any expression with that meaning involving the right hand or arm in Latin.

Off the top of my head, I would express the idea with satelles/minister/adiutor praecipuus or something like that. That's not something I've actually read anywhere, though.
 

LenCabral

Member
What do you think of using Achates for this? Could this type of usage been possible in classical?
 

Adrian

Civis Illustris
What do you think of using Achates for this? Could this type of usage been possible in classical?
It would have to be fidus Achates. (theoritically, it can be used as synonym for faithful/ reliable friend) - it all depends on your perception if such expression suits your understanding (you could as well use alter idem if aspect of trust or reliability was of great importance)

a very important assistant who helps someone do a job - magni momenti adiutor
 

scrabulista

Consul
Staff member
Hi all,

In English, the term "right-hand-(wo)man" stands in for "second-in-command," etc. Is there an analogous term in Latin? I know French allows for something like "bras droit," I wonder if the same is attested in Latin.
Nicene Creed comes to mind....
sedet ad dexteram Dei Patris omnipotentis,
Now is this the provenance of "right hand man?" That's tricky. The earliest citations in google books seem to be military, but is this just the man in the same rank (row) as the soldier on the right, rather than the most trusted?
 
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