Rock

scrabulista

Consul

  • Consul

We have several threads involving "rock" -- I was specifically referring to "rock music" or a verb meaning "to excel/excite:"

EDIT: Nikolaos is joking in his sigfile but this one may not be(but not a good choice):
viewtopic.php?f=2&t=2592&p=14133

Here we have musica rocenrolis (I don't like it); musica rockica is better:
viewtopic.php?f=5&t=7092
viewtopic.php?f=2&t=2698&p=14864

I agree that musica vibrivolvens is probably meant:
viewtopic.php?f=2&t=6108
viewtopic.php?f=2&t=5593
viewtopic.php?f=2&t=808

Lepidissimus,-a,-um...but maybe this means "the coolest." Magnus is similar.
viewtopic.php?f=2&t=5338
viewtopic.php?f=2&t=2214

Roc or clamor in this thread:
viewtopic.php?f=2&t=2136
 

Nikolaos

schmikolaos

  • Censor

Hmmm... What is rock music called in the Romance languages?

As to the person who posted that, my guess is that it was, at least in part, a joke.


Sent from my iPod touch using Tapatalk
 

Akela

sum

  • Princeps Senatus

In Russian it stays as "rock" music ...
 

Nikolaos

schmikolaos

  • Censor

I checked the whole wide Internet (or I just looked at the top three results of a few Google searches, same thing), and it seems that it's called "Rock" in virtually all (or at least three) Romance languages... that makes things unfairly difficult.

I propose styx, -ycis, m.

I'll have to think this over to see if I can think of a real suggestion.
 

Akela

sum

  • Princeps Senatus

As in the Styx river?

Hm, what about just leaving it as "rock" (for music, anyway), since this is a universally recognized term?..


"Exceling/exciting" will need a completely different term, of course.
 

scrabulista

Consul

  • Consul

Vibraturos vos salutamus
 

JaimeB

Civis Illustris

  • Civis Illustris

Well, some people associate this with the noun "rock," as in "stone," but I would think most would agree that it comes from the verb "rock" as in "rock the cradle."

This verb in English can mean either a gentle movement (as with a cradle, or a baby in one's arms) or a violent one (as an earthquake).

I looked into this in a variety of ways, and found some hints through looking up "rocking chair" in various Romance languages and then checking the etymologies of the terms:

Spanish: mecedora, from mecer, to rock, orig. uncert. (I think this might be from misceo, which can mean 'stir up')
Italian: sedia a dondolo, poss. from Lat. *undulare < undare 'undulate, waver'
Portuguese: cadeira de balanço, from Late Latin, bilanx 'scale' (bis + lanx 'plate, scale')
French: fauteuil à bascule, orig. uncert. (but I think this might be from vacillare, 'totter, stagger')

Hmmm.... None of these seems very apt, but perhaps for those who associate substance abuse with rock music, vacillare might be the most "staggering" of these. ("Stagger" as a verb can mean to shock, or to cause to reel or totter.)
 

Secundus

New Member

I thought "rock" referred to the verb (according to Merriam-Webster: "to cause to sway back and forth" or "to cause to shake violently" or "to astonish or disturb greatly").

So, what about musica vibrationum?
 
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