Roman Litterature

Symposion

Active Member
Have you read either Römische Literatur by the German Professor for classical Latin philology Manfred Fuhrmann or Latin Literature. The Cambridge History of Classical Literature 2 edited by the British Latinist Edward John Kenney? Which one do you like more? Because I am better at English than German I think that I will choose the English book.
 

Symposion

Active Member
I have decided that I will read The Cambridge History of Classical Literature 2. Latin Literature edited by the British Latinist Edward John Kenney. It is very interesting. Have anyone else here read it? If so then what did you like about it?
 

Symposion

Active Member
It is already a bit older as it was published already in 1982 but it is a classic in Latin philology. The first part deals with the Greek literature.
 

Anbrutal Russicus

Active Member
I've been wanting to read something on the topic in Latin for a long while now because I can't be arsed to read it in another language. I also want meticulous detail and insightful commentary (Aspects of the Language of Latin Prose) but I won't exactly learn the general history of the literature from this. Since Latin writing implies terribly outdated scholarship, gaps and generalisations, this seems like the best bet to me as a quick read, but it would be cool to find someone highly fluent in the subject as well as in Latin who could provide running commentary on how the understanding has changed and what new things have been discovered since then. If you're there, write to me sempai *_*

p.s.: Stroh's lectures are rather boring when you can't watch him :-[
 
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Symposion

Active Member
I've been wanting to read something on the topic in Latin for a long while now because I can't be arsed to read it in another language. I also want meticulous detail and insightful commentary (Aspects of the Language of Latin Prose) but I won't exactly learn the general history of the literature from this. Since Latin writing implies terribly outdated scholarship, gaps and generalisations, this seems like the best bet to me as a quick read, but it would be cool to find someone highly fluent in the subject as well as in Latin who could provide running commentary on how the understanding has changed and what new things have been discovered since then.
It is also good to read scholarly literature about the Latin texts indeed. The sad aspect is as you mention outdated scholarship. I did think that also about this almost 1000 pages book about the Roman Latin litterature The Cambridge History of Classical Literature 2. Latin Literature is almost 40 years old as it was published by Cambridge University Press already in 1982. I was thinking surely there must be much recent new results and insights of the past 40 years made in scholarship of Roman litterature.
 

Anbrutal Russicus

Active Member
Lol, ille equidem magna voce magnoque dicendi furore efferri nonnumquam non aliter quam Adolphus ille infamis videtur! :D
Frūstrā ēloquentiam Latīnam ex terrīs tollere cōnāti sunt: nam in silvīs Trānsalpīnīs superfuit et flōruit, unde nōs fēlīcēs prīmō Adolphō, tum Valahfridō sumus dōnātī! Et sī pauxillō āmente :D
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Strohs großer Held ist der "orator perfectus" der römischen Republik, der Meister der der herzbewegenden Rede, Marcus Tullius Cicero. Der hatte immer wieder betont, Redner müssten eine gute Stimmung schaffen. Eine gute Rede sollte eine perpetua festivitas besitzen, eine durchgängige Heiterkeit."
 

Anbrutal Russicus

Active Member
It is also good to read scholarly literature about the Latin texts indeed. The sad aspect is as you mention outdated scholarship. I did think that also about this almost 1000 pages book about the Roman Latin litterature The Cambridge History of Classical Literature 2. Latin Literature is almost 40 years old as it was published by Cambridge University Press already in 1982. I was thinking surely there must be much recent new results and insights of the past 40 years made in scholarship of Roman litterature.
When talking about outdated scholarship I meant scholarship in Latin, mind you - when it comes to the classics, 40 years is as good as modern; besides, I don't imagine there's been enough real or theoretical discoveries that would result in any notable revisions to such a general overview. There have been quite a few more narrow and specialised studies though, or ones looking at the subject under different lenses - especially it seems when it comes to drama.

Oh, there is Michael von Albrecht's Geschichte der römischen Literatur von Andronicus bis Boëthius (3. Aufl.) together with its English translation A history of Roman literature: from Livius Andronicus to Boethius, available at a certain Library Genesis.
 
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Symposion

Active Member
Oh, there is Michael von Albrecht's Geschichte der römischen Literatur von Andronicus bis Boëthius (3. Aufl.) together with its English translation A history of Roman literature: from Livius Andronicus to Boethius, available at a certain Library Genesis.
And Manfred Fuhrmann as mentioned above.
 
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