Salakian Latin Noun/Pronoun Discussion

Long preface short, the Salakian Empire uses a version of Latin that only has common and neuter genders because its founding race, the sargon, evolved to be female-bodied hermaphrodites who became more concerned with themselves than the surface world because their only contact with it until people began exploring the seafloor was ships dropping anchor near their territory.

By the time they'd evolved into the form above, they'd re-purposed all non-neuter nouns into common nouns, thereby making a significant percentage of II declension nouns (dominus, equus, etc.) echo the meanings of their I declension forms (domina, equa, etc.). They chose to favor the latter over the former. What percentage of II declension nouns did sargons drop because of redundancy?
 

AoM

nulli numeri
Oh, you're asking how many second declension nouns have a feminine variant?
 
One might expect that all of the non neuter o-ſtems would eventually diſappear. Thoſe referring to male perſons or animals might be first to go through ſimple redundancy, but with the idea of ſex-baſed gender gone, the remaining maſculine form inamimates would ſoon fall in with the neuters. Phonetic changes reſulting in the loſs of caſe diſtinctions, however, could eaſily drive ſuch evolution in a totally different direction.
 

scrabulista

Consul
Staff member
This is not an easy question to answer. On the one hand, there are -us/-a variants which are not simply a difference in gender.

burgaria = burglary; burgarius = inhabitant of a castle.
caela = kind of beer; caelus = heaven, sky (also caelum)

On the other hand (this is more common), almost any adjective can be used as a noun. So you could get a wide variety of answers, each of which was "right."
 
The question's referring to the nouns that would have become redundant upon use as common nouns, such as equa/us (mare/horse --> horse) and puella/r (girl/boy --> child).
 

scrabulista

Consul
Staff member
Right...you can't just write a computer program taking off every -us ending, affixing an -a, and checking to see if the result is in your word list.

If you extend your search to things like puella/puer, the task becomes even harder.
 
Okay. It looks like Salakian Latin keeps all five declensions, in that case.

To the mods (Aurifex, Iohannes, etc.): PLease change the topic's name to Salakian Latin Noun/Pronoun Discussion so I can use of this topic to include the generalities of Salakian Latin nouns and pronouns.
 

Iohannes Aurum

Technicus Auxiliarius
Okay. It looks like Salakian Latin keeps all five declensions, in that case.

To the mods (Aurifex, Iohannes, etc.): PLease change the topic's name to Salakian Latin Noun/Pronoun Discussion so I can use of this topic to include the generalities of Salakian Latin nouns and pronouns.
Done
 
There's a city named Kastra Kuantas in Lanoruia. However, while kastra is an extant I declension noun, Kuantas seems to falls III declension due to ending in -s. Would would please help me finish it's declension table?

Nom.: Kuantas
Gen./Loc.: Kuantasí(?)
Dat.: ???
Acc.: ???
Voc.: ???
 

Dantius

Homo Sapiens
Staff member
"castra" is not I declension. It is second declension neuter plural. (castra, castrorum, castris, etc.)
 

Iáson

Cívis Illústris
There's a city named Kastra Kuantas in Lanoruia. However, hile kastra is an extant I declension noun, Kuantas seems to falls III declension due to ending in -s. Would would please help me finish it's declension table?

Nom.: Kuantas
Gen./Loc.: Kuantasí(?)
Dat.: ???
Acc.: ???
Voc.: ???
A third declension noun in -as could decline in a number of ways, because lots of stems give -as after a consonant of the stem assimilates to the -s of the nominative. Possibilities I can think of are:

kuantat- (like anas, anatis)
kuantad- (like vas, vadis)
kuantass- (like ás, assis)

I can't think of any stems in -as, but I assume that if they did exist they would undergo rhotacism like the stems in -os, and the medial a would then become e.
N. V. *kuantas
A. *kuanterem
G. *kuanteris

D. *kuanterí
Abl. *kuantere

But this is just a philological exercise. I recommend you go with one of the three alternatives above, and probably vas or anas. Then the place name will be kastra with a genitive of kuantas.
 

Iáson

Cívis Illústris

Aurifex

Aedilis
Staff member
L&S gives the following references (which I'm not going to try and decipher):
Att. ap. Non. p. 200, 30; Trag. Rel. p. 238 Rib.
In full this would read:
"Attius (i.e. Accius) quoted in Nonius p.200, 30; p.238 of Ribbeck's Tragicorum Reliquiae, (which is the title of volume 1 of his Scenicae Romanorum Poesis Fragmenta)."
 
It'll be declined like anas (duck). Is the declension table below correct (sing./plur.)?

Nom.: Kuantas/Kuanites
Gen.: Kuantatis/Kuantatum (Kuantatium)
Acc.: Kuantati/Kuantates
Abl.: Kuantate/Kuantatibus
Voc.: Kuantas/Kuantates
 
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