SCOTTISH

J.M

Active Member
Just a little...
 

Issacus Divus

H₃rḗǵs h₁n̥dʰéri diwsú
At least it's some. Better a little than nothing!
 
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J.M

Active Member
You are very right indeed!
J.M
 

Issacus Divus

H₃rḗǵs h₁n̥dʰéri diwsú
Terry, you hit the pot of gold!


There are many more good ones from that site, too!

From the first page of The Expansion and Contraction of Gaelic.

For at least 600 years, between the tenth and the sixteenth centuries, Galloway was a Gaelic speaking land. Although both the beginning and the end of Gaelic Galloway are uncertain, that Gaelic was the language of the kingdom of Galloway established by Fergus in the early eleventh century and was still the main language of the Douglas lordship of Galloway at its end in 1455 is indisputable. In addition to the Gaelic personal and place names recorded in medieval charters, the thousands of Gaelic place names which survived to be recorded by the Ordnance Survey in the 1850's bear witness to Galloway’s Gaelic past. Furthermore, despite the language shift to Scots, there is evidence of cultural continuity between the agriculture of Gaelic Galloway and the farming practice of seventeenth and early eighteenth century Galloway. Then, at the end of the eighteenth century, the process of agricultural improvement began, a process which has continued to the present. The cumulative effect of this process in the lowlands combined with afforestation in the uplands has been the erasure of Galloway’s past. The Galloway landscape known by the Galloway Levellers and the Covenanters would have still been familiar to the medieval Gaelic farmers who named the land, but none would recognise the landscape of the present.
In 1755, it is estimated that 23% of the Scottish population (concentrated in the Highlands and Islands) spoke Gaelic. In 1901 only 4.5 % were still Gaelic speakers and by 2001 the numbers had fallen to 1.2%. Concern over the decline of Gaelic led to the passing of the Gaelic Language (Scotland) Act in 2005 and the establishment of the Bord na Gaidhlig in 2006. The Bord na Gaidhlig’s priority is to increase the number of Gaelic speakers. In November 2010, Dumfries and Galloway’s Community Learning and Development Service received funding of £45 000 from the Bord to support adult Gaelic learning in the region.As the number of Gaelic speakers in the region increases, interest in the region’s Gaelic history and the traces it has left in the place names of the region will also increase.
 

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Issacus Divus

H₃rḗǵs h₁n̥dʰéri diwsú
Black Hole Primea.jpg


A ’chiad ìomhaigh de thuill dubh!
 

Issacus Divus

H₃rḗǵs h₁n̥dʰéri diwsú
10 – Puirt-A-Beul Set: Ribinnean Riomhach
https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=tPZ6wxph3G4
9 – Sios Dhan An Abhainn
https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=X2toIQxHxiM
8 – Tha Mo Ghaol Air Àird a’ Chuan
https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=Wl-A5FJffik
7 – Canan nan Gaidheal
https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=BZWgJpsVYEU
6 – Oganaich Uir A Rinn M’fhagail
https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=5S3PJ3skBjs
5 – An Eala Bhàn
https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=6qWWgntTdO0
4 – Fear a Bhàta
https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=GHe2H2WOQXs
3 – Gràdh Geal Mo Chridhe
https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=Wll2o21LUbY
2 – Oran Fir Heisgeir (Gura Mis’ Tha Fo Mhighean) – Julie Fowlis
https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=FMapSWdJgUU
1 – Tàladah Chriosda
https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=nj44ICE_AAg



Songs in Scottish Gaelic.
 

Issacus Divus

H₃rḗǵs h₁n̥dʰéri diwsú

Issacus Divus

H₃rḗǵs h₁n̥dʰéri diwsú
Scottish is going pretty good.
I wonder if anyone is using this thread to actually learn Scottish.
Maybe I should have a schedule? Like, every 4 days or so I post some grammar stuff?
We'll see.
 

Issacus Divus

H₃rḗǵs h₁n̥dʰéri diwsú
I'm not sure.
Here's some noun declension:

Compound nouns can be formed in a few ways:


'shop' + obrach gen. ofobair 'work' - bUth-obrach brith



mor-shluagh (mor adj., 'big'+ sluagh 'people')



ro-shealladh (ro prep., 'before' + sea//adh 'view')


bodachan (bodach 'old man' +-an diminutive suffix)


Possessive pronouns:


Gaelic has pronouns roughly equivalent to English my, your, his, her, etc. However these tend to only be used when the possession is of a particularly close or personal nature. For example, they are used with body parts (my arm), family members (my mother), and possession that is clearly ownership and not temporary.
PersonSingularPlural
1 my moL our àrN
2 your doL your ùrN
3 masc his aL their an/am
3 feminine her aH




Notes on phonology:
  • L stands for lenition trigger, N stands for Eclipsis/nasalization trigger, H indicates the word prefixes an <h> in front of the following word. These letters are not written but are provided here as guides.
  • am is used instead of an in front of words beginning with any labial consonant (i.e. <b, m, f, p>), eg. their table am bòrd
  • before words beginning with vowels "mo" is reduced to mo', do is reduced to d', and aL his is deleted.
 

Issacus Divus

H₃rḗǵs h₁n̥dʰéri diwsú
Screen Shot 2019-04-12 at 1.26.06 PM.png
 

Issacus Divus

H₃rḗǵs h₁n̥dʰéri diwsú
 

Issacus Divus

H₃rḗǵs h₁n̥dʰéri diwsú
Let Me try to form some sentences. Until a pure Scaelic speaker comes along, Terry will be King when it comes to corrections and such. I'm still learning this beautiful language Myself.

Bidh Mi a 'siubhal
I ride
Bidh Thu a 'siubhal
You ride
(Do you see how Scaelic works yet? Sorta? You use Bidh to talk on these present things.)
(Remeber that Bidh is the present imperfective, future independent of Bi, one of the two copula.)

Scots away!
Screenshot (41).png
 

Issacus Divus

H₃rḗǵs h₁n̥dʰéri diwsú
Present independent is
Present relative as
Present dependent bu
Past bu
 

Issacus Divus

H₃rḗǵs h₁n̥dʰéri diwsú
Air Cuan Dubh Drilseach.

This is a science-fiction book, fully written in Scaelic.
 

Issacus Divus

H₃rḗǵs h₁n̥dʰéri diwsú
 

Issacus Divus

H₃rḗǵs h₁n̥dʰéri diwsú
I was trying to delay this thread reaching 1000 views (for a good reason), but Scots is just way too good to be unnoticed.

Well, I was going to start a Russian thread, but this isn't a Swedish thread, so it wouldn't be a continuation.
I'll make a thread on the Anglic lengyages, which include Scots.
 

Issacus Divus

H₃rḗǵs h₁n̥dʰéri diwsú
Ok.
As the Anglics thread is, so be needed the move to 'Scots for awhile. Here I will list messages on the lengye.
'Scots grammar is a wee diff'rnt than Engles today, but it can be lerned and discussed.

Here w'go:

Growth on the lengyes:



Red= Old English by the beginning of the 9th century in the northern portion of the Anglo-Saxon kingdom of Northumbria, now part of Scotland
Orange= Early Scots by the beginning of the 15th century
Yellow= Modern Scots by the mid 20th century

I suppose we start wi' Early Scots, yea?
 

Issacus Divus

H₃rḗǵs h₁n̥dʰéri diwsú
Maybe the way they speak is different than what you know.
 
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