Shakespeare's Thread

LCF

a.k.a. Lucifer
Shakespeare was a plugarist...
 

Serenus

legātus armisonus
When Shakespeare passed away in 1616 at the age of 52, he was mourned by the entire community, but not as a writer. The funeral monument erected for this complex man in Stratford featured him holding not a quill or a scroll but a big bag of grain. Still, he got a statue, and there aren't a lot of writers who can say that.
Wait- So is the author of this article saying that the statue, presumably made due to this fame as a writer, included an ironic insult? There's no way they would've celebrated his food hoarding.
Shakespeare was a plugarist...
A what? I thought this was going to be a bilingual Latin or Greek pun with "plagiarist" + another word, but *plugō doesn't seem to exist in either language.

(In fact, amusingly, the Liddell-Scott-Jones' entries jump from πλοώδης to πλύμα. Apparently there are no words with e.g. πλυβ- πλυδ- πλυθ- πλυκ-.)
 

LCF

a.k.a. Lucifer
Shakespeare was a plagiarist
 

LCF

a.k.a. Lucifer
Shakespeare was a plagiarist. Do you deny it? Do you deny it!?
 

Serenus

legātus armisonus
@Etaoin Shrdlu My question about what the author of the article implied is serious though. Is it that the people put up that statue of Shakespeare but included an insult in his hand? As if some town would put up a statue of Mother Teresa in a pious pose while dropping analgesic pills from her hand onto the ground (to insult her for her "love poverty, not the poor" thing).
 

LCF

a.k.a. Lucifer
Have you listen to Christofer Hitches discuss Mother Teresa?
 

Etaoin Shrdlu

Civis Illustris
My question about what the author of the article implied is serious though. Is it that the people put up that statue of Shakespeare but included an insult in his hand? As if some town would put up a statue of Mother Teresa in a pious pose while dropping analgesic pills from her hand onto the ground (to insult her for her "love poverty, not the poor" thing).
I don't think that was the intention, though it may seem like it, knowing what we know now. But I haven't really looked into it.
 
@Etaoin Shrdlu My question about what the author of the article implied is serious though. Is it that the people put up that statue of Shakespeare but included an insult in his hand?
Well it's added weight to the authorship debate over the years but I'm not sure what this author is really trying to do. I try and steer clear of those fact-hash pieces on him tbh.
 
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Adrian

Civis Illustris
I really like Tom Hiddleston as an actor, but I am not sure if taking the role of Coriolanus was a wise choice (He did really well as Henry V).
It's just my subjective opinion, but I think his performance as Coriolanus was "wishy-washy". I apologise in advance if I offended any Tom Hiddleston fan.

 
I really like Tom Hiddleston as an actor, but I am not sure if taking the role of Coriolanus was a wise choice (He did really well as Henry V).
It's just my subjective opinion, but I think his performance as Coriolanus was "wishy-washy". I apologise in advance if I offended any Tom Hiddleston fan.

Completely agree.

Edit: Ralph Fiennes' adaption wherein he plays the big man too was brilliant. Have you seen it? I'm sure he directed too, I should check.
 
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Adrian

Civis Illustris
Completely agree.

Edit: Ralph Fiennes' adaption wherein he plays the big man too was brilliant. Have you seen it? I'm sure he directed too, I should check.
I've seen it. I liked it (both acting of Ralph Fiennes and Gerard Butler) . Yes, Fiennes directed it too and he did a solid good work.

@Adrian just on the Hollow Crown series, what did you think of Ben Wishaw as Richard II?

I thought he was outstanding.
Truth be told, I used to (and somewhat still) consider Ben Whishaw as one-hit-wonder (Perfume: The Story of a Murderer), and I could not believe he was cast as Richard II, but he actually played well (very melodramatic depiction of the character).

As far as Hollow Crown series are considered, I really liked Henry V most (The St Crispin's Day Speech)

 
I've seen it. I liked it (both acting of Ralph Fiennes and Gerard Butler) . Yes, Fiennes directed it too and he did a solid good work.


Truth be told, I used to (and somewhat still) consider Ben Whishaw as one-hit-wonder (Perfume: The Story of a Murderer),
That's a fantastic film. A slight digression but that was Kurt Cobain's favourite novel and he used to carry a small paperback of it around with him wherever he went.

but he actually played well (very melodramatic depiction of the character).
Yes, again you've hit the nail on the head for me. I think I have a leaning to this type of acting tbh, for certain roles at least.

As far as Hollow Crown series are considered, I really liked Henry V most (The St Crispin's Day Speech)
Yes, he played a blinder. Thought the chap playing Hotspur was great too, in fact the whole HC cycle cast was brilliant.
 
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