Si dixerimus

COPLAND 3

Member
This is the gloss for 1 John 1:6 which probably needs correction if someone can check it out? Thank you!


Si dixerimus. Hactenus commendatio epistolae; hic ostendit qualiter charitas sit habenda. Et in tenebris, etc. Persistentes in peccatis, et alios obscurantes non computantur in membris ejus; unde: Quae conventio Christi ad Belial? quae societas lucis ad tenebras? II Cor. 6.

If we say. Thus far by the commending of the letter, here he shows how love is to be held. And walk in darkness, and so on. The persisting in sins and the darkening of others are not reckoned in the members thereof: whence: What concord has Christ with Belial? And what communion has light with darkness? 2 Cor. 6.
 

Matthaeus

Vemortuicida strenuus
maybe "how love is to be considered/esteemed"
"the ones persisting in sin and obscuring others"
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
If we say. The commending of the epistle ends here; here he shows how love is to be obtained. And walk in darness, etc. Those who persist in sins and those who cover others with obscurity are not reckoned among his members/limbs, whence: what concord etc.
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
maybe "how love is to be considered/esteemed"
He often repeats this and things of the kind "those who... don't have love", "love is in him who...", so I think it's literally about how to have it, how to obtain it.
 

limetrees

Civis Illustris
Hactenus commendatio epistolae

This needs to be "Thus far the "commendatio" of the letter".
(or its exordium, or such). It is a comment on the letter's format, with an opening "commendatio" (maybe "opening address/salutation"?) You see what I'm getting at.
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
Well it happens in Latin to use substantivized participles instead of relative clauses.
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
I guess!
 

COPLAND 3

Member
Abbatissæ Scriptor

Yes, every quote by the glossator is always a condensed version of some earlier writer. There are various ways that they saved space such as using a few words as possible and abbreviating. Similar to some of the ancient Bible manuscripts, which the old uncials would not even put spaces between words or use any punctuation.
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
I've been re-thinking about that habenda thing, partially because of a passage in the interlinear glosses where that expression is found again, and I wonder if it wouldn't in fact mean "how one should have love" in the sense "how one should love". Now I'd even lean towards this interpretation.
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
Or maybe "charity" instead of "love". As I've already said, this word c(h)aritas is annoying because of its two possible translations. In the beginning I always translated it as "love", now lately I've translated it more as "charity", because I noticed it's often the way it's translated in the bible, though not absolutely always, for it sometimes says "love" too. Maybe it would be good to be consistent, and settle on "charity" everywhere... And maybe we should warn the readers in the book about the meaning of this word, which is not exactly "charity" in the modern sense, restricted to giving to the poor etc., but "Christian" love of humankind.
 

COPLAND 3

Member
Great point. If you feel comfortable maybe you could write a bit of a translator's preface before its officially published, mentioning some of the things you have noticed about the gloss while translating. I will be providing an introduction and so on myself.
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
I had said no the first time you proposed it, because I've never done such a thing so I fear I shouldn't find my words, but I'll think about it again, and maybe I'll write something short.
 

Matthaeus

Vemortuicida strenuus
That is quite an honour, PP! I'd take the proposition. ;)
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
Sure it's an honor! I'm just not sure I'm equal to it, lol, we'll see.
 

Matthaeus

Vemortuicida strenuus
Ah, give it thy best. I am sure thou canst.
 
Top