Strike down my enemy with your thunderbolt.

Would the underlined sentence be a correct translation of the following?

Strike down my enemy with your thunderbolt.

Feri deorsum hostem meum cum fulmine tuo.
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
Not quite. Feri deorsum is a word-for-word translation of "strike down", but it doesn't really work in Latin. "Strike down" can translate to prosterne. When "with" means "by means of" rather than "together/in company with", you don't use cum, but the bare ablative (ablative of means).
 
I am indeed, I hope the following is an accurate translation
Jupiter, pater caeli, dominus tonitrus, dominus meus; obsecro te.

Jupiter, sky father, lord of thunder, my lord; I implore you.
Please let me know if there are any corrections I need to make in my invocation.
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
It's usually Iuppiter (or Juppiter, depending on your orthography style, whether you differenciate i and j or not) with two p's in Latin.

You're calling him directly here, so you need all the names you call him to be in the vocative: Iuppiter, pater caeli, domine tonitrus, domine mi.
 
Thanks, I will also make those same corrections to the invocations of other gods I have been using.

With what you just informed me about all of the titles being in the vocative, are all of the titles in the following invocations in the correct case?
Vesta, matrona foci, domina mea, obsecro te.
Aurora, domina lucis prima, domina mea; obsecro te.
Apollo, domine solis, artifex musicae, domine mi, obsecro te.
Diana, domina lunae, virgo venatrix, domina mea; obsecro te.
Vulcan, domine ignis, faber divine, domine mi; obsecro te.
Hades, Dis Pater, une inaspectus, domine mi; obsecro te.
Mercury, pes celer, nunti divine, domine mi; obsecro te.
Terra, Terra Mater, domina mea; obsecro te.
Hades, Dis Pater, Rex mortui, domine mi, obsecro te.
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
Can you give me the English versions too?
 
As you wish, my apologies for not including the english with my last post. I have also included one in both Latin and English I forgot to include the last time. Hades appears twice on the list because in the Death Arcanum the spell caster is invoking him in his role as King of the dead and in the forces arcanum the spell caster is invoking him in his title of The Unseen One for casting spells of invisibility due to his Helm of Darkness which renders the wearer invisible.
Vesta, matron of the hearth, my lady, I implore you.
Aurora, lady of first light, my lady; I implore you.
Apollo, lord of the sun, master of music, my lord; I implore you
Diana, lady of the moon, virgin huntress, my lady; I implore you.
Vulcan, lord of fire, divine smith, my lord; I implore you.
Hades, wealthy father, the unseen one, my lord; I implore you
Mercury, swift foot, divine messenger, my lord; I implore you.
Terra, mother earth, my lady; I implore you.
Hades, Wealthy Father, King of the dead; my lord, I implore you.
Erebus, Pater umbrae, Domine tenebrae; domine mi, obsecro te.
Erebus, Father of the shadows, Lord of darkness; my lord, I implore you.
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
Aurora, lady of first light, my lady; I implore you.
Aurora, domina lucis prima, domina mea; obsecro te.
Prima should agree with lucis: primae.
Apollo, lord of the sun, master of music, my lord; I implore you
Apollo, domine solis, artifex musicae, domine mi, obsecro te.
Artifex doesn't really mean "master", but more like "artificer" or "maker".
Vulcan, lord of fire, divine smith, my lord; I implore you.
Vulcan, domine ignis, faber divine, domine mi; obsecro te.
"Vulcan" in Latin is Volcanus, i (or, alternatively, Vulcanus, i). Vocative in -e, as is regular for that declension.
Hades, wealthy father, the unseen one, my lord; I implore you
Hades, Dis Pater, une inaspectus, domine mi; obsecro te.
Since Hades is taken from Greek, perhaps it should take a Greek vocative, Hade. Or you could use his other name, which is more usually found in Latin, Pluto.

Inaspectus isn't in the right case (it should be vocative).

Unus isn't really used that way in Latin; it should be removed, otherwise it would mean "the only unseen one".
Mercury, swift foot, divine messenger, my lord; I implore you.
Mercury, pes celer, nunti divine, domine mi; obsecro te.
Mercury in Latin is Mercurius, i (vocative Mercuri).
Terra, mother earth, my lady; I implore you.
Terra, Terra Mater, domina mea; obsecro te.
Maybe it would be good to say Tellus Mater, to avoid repeating Terra.
Hades, Wealthy Father, King of the dead; my lord, I implore you. Hades, Dis Pater, Rex mortui, domine mi, obsecro te.
Same here as above concerning Hades.

Mortuiis in the wrong number; it's singular ("of a/the dead man") while you need the plural ("of the dead").
Erebus, Pater umbrae, Domine tenebrae; domine mi, obsecro te.
Erebus, Father of the shadows, Lord of darkness; my lord, I implore you.
Erebus is in the wrong case (it should be vocative).

Umbrae is in the wrong number.

Tenebrae is normally found only in the plural in Latin, so you need to make it plural even if "darkness" is singular in English.
 
I have made the following changes based upon your feed back. Please let me know if there are any further corrections to be made. All the corrections I have made have been bolded and I am unsure but I believe Erebi is the Vocative of Erebus and I believe I have the correct number for umbrarum and tenebrarum.
Aurora, domina lucis primae, domina mea; obsecro te.
Aurora, lady of first light, my lady; I implore you.
Apollo, domine solis, magister musicae, domine mi, obsecro te.
Apollo, lord of the sun, master of music, my lord; I implore you.
Vulcane, domine ignis, faber divine, domine mi; obsecro te.
Vulcan, lord of fire, divine smith, my lord; I implore you.
Hade, Dis Pater,invisitate, domine mi; obsecro te.
Hades, wealthy father, the unseen, my lord; I implore you.
Mercuri, pes celer, nunti divine, domine mi; obsecro te.
Mercury, swift foot, divine messenger, my lord; I implore you.
Erebi, Pater umbrarum, Domine tenebrarum; domine mi, obsecro te
Erebus, Father of the shadows, Lord of darkness; my lord, I implore you.
Hade, Dis Pater, Rex mortuorum, domine mi, obsecro te.
Hades, Wealthy Father, King of the dead; my lord, I implore you.
 

Araneus

Umbraticus Lector
I would make it primae lucis instead of other way around, because that (prima lux) is a very common way of saying daybreak. Just a detail, but it sounds/looks better too.
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
Hade, Dis Pater,invisitate, domine mi; obsecro te.
I think the word you had first used for "unseen" was better than this one.
Erebi, Pater umbrarum, Domine tenebrarum; domine mi, obsecro te
The vocative of Erebus is Erebe, not Erebi. It's nouns that end in -ius in the nominative that end in -i in the vocative.

The rest looks ok.
I would make it primae lucis instead of other way around, because that (prima lux) is a very common way of saying daybreak.
It's also found in the other order.
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
I don't think it's ideal because it more often means "hateful, odious". As I said, I think the word you'd first used (inaspectus) is ok; just fix the case to the vocative.
 
Ok, do you happen to know what the vocative form is for inaspectus, because it doesn't come up when I type it into wiktionary and when I used aspectus, it said that aspectus is both Nominative and Vocative?
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
The vocative ending is the regular one for second declension nouns and adjectives in -us, namely -e.

When they told you the vocative of aspectus was the same as the nominative, you were probably looking at the fourth declension noun aspectus, us, meaning "sight" or "appearance".
 
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