tantus in ea viguit caelestis decor tantaque morum aelegantia polluit

I guess these are manuscripts of Boccaccio "Genealogia Deorum"? Are either of them available online? I would appreciate the manuscript refs and/or an online link...
 
This one is in the Bibliothèque national de France, lat. 7877, copied in 1388. It is a good, clean copy, that was once part of the Visconti library in Pavia.

https://gallica.bnf.fr/ark:/12148/btv1b10036922s/f1.planchecontact

You can download the text, but note that it is a medium-resolution copy. To see it at the highest resolution they have, you have to be on the website, then click on the page you want, then click on it again to zoom in.

The BnF probably has other copies, but this is the one I have used most since the author I am concerned with on this thread probably wrote in Pavia (or Milan), and may have used this very copy.
 
This one is in the Bibliothèque national de France, lat. 7877, copied in 1388. It is a good, clean copy, that was once part of the Visconti library in Pavia.

https://gallica.bnf.fr/ark:/12148/btv1b10036922s/f1.planchecontact

You can download the text, but note that it is a medium-resolution copy. To see it at the highest resolution they have, you have to be on the website, then click on the page you want, then click on it again to zoom in.

The BnF probably has other copies, but this is the one I have used most since the author I am concerned with on this thread probably wrote in Pavia (or Milan), and may have used this very copy.

Thank you! I appreciate it.

As for the text you're translating, did that require much editing? Is it an autograph, what's the state of the text, etc.
 
Thank you! I appreciate it.

As for the text you're translating, did that require much editing? Is it an autograph, what's the state of the text, etc.
The manuscript is here -
https://gallica.bnf.fr/ark:/12148/btv1b10034398d/f1.planchecontact

It's a humanist hand from 1449, the copyist is even known - Michele Salvatico. It is not the autograph, but a copy from the autograph. There are some mistakes, as Pacifica helped discover in previous posts (e.g. exuviae instead of the erroneous eximiae). It is in perfect condition. You can see color images of some of the pages here, first book/link listed -
http://bm.angers.fr/patrimoine-depot-legal/le-roi-rene-et-les-livres/les-livres-des-princes-d-anjou/livres-d-isabelle-de-lorraine-et-de-jeanne-de-laval-epouses-du-roi-rene/index.html

It didn't take any editing, just a transcription. That was hard for me at first, in 2003, since I had no experience in paleography, even in the relatively clear humanist writing. All of the basic abbreviations were taken over into Renaissance printing, so they were easy to learn, however. Nevertheless, there were some ambiguities that were only cleared up by the second manuscript, which I discovered last September (along with a third I have not seen, it is in a private library in Calabria that is closed to researchers, to the distress of many). The second manuscript, in Brescia, was not copied from the Paris manuscript, but could have easily been a direct copy of the autograph as well.

In any case, having both manuscripts gives us confidence that we can establish an almost perfect text.
 
When our book (text and translation) is published (we are aiming for the end of April), I would like to acknowledge by name those who have helped us with the problems I've posted one this thread and elsewhere. I will not make you responsible for any specific translation! Just a general thank you, in the form of "so-and-so, and so-and-so, from the Latin Discussion Forum." I can't find any way to contact any of you privately, and I understand there is a good privacy policy here, so I won't put my email here or ask for yours.

Perhaps Pacifica or another moderator can tell me how to go about it.

In any case, I will thank the members of the Latin Discussion Forum in the acknowledgements, either specifically by name or pseudonym, or generally.
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
I suppose people will read your post and private-message you to give you their names if they wish. I will.
 
I think it's literally something along the lines of "To the left, a certain radiance which, although he (= Juppiter) commended it greatly in his sacred laws, he nonetheless violent[ly] hid from the [one who was] greedy for it."

Or, rephrased to make it a bit easier to follow: "To the left, a certain radiance which he commended greatly in his sacred laws, but forcibly hid from the man who was greedy for it."

I'm not sure what this refers to. The sun? Gold?
It occurred to me that this could be someone who tried to steal Jove's thunder. I couldn't remember the name, but I finally found it in Salmoneus, who forced his people to worship him as Zeus, and made a contraption to imitate the thunder. Zeus struck him down with a thunderbolt.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Salmoneus
 
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