Terentii Andria

limetrees

Civis Illustris
nunc quam rem vitio dent quaeso animum adtendite
= now I ask you to look at the thing they criticise [him, the poet of the earlier part, for]
(aliquid alicui vitio dare: impute something to someone as a vice/crime etc.)

qui utramvis recte norit ambas noverit
= who knows one [play] knows both [not Terence, but anyone]

Faciuntne intellegendo ut nihil intellegant?
= As for understanding, don’t they behave as if they understood nothing?
[although I think that “–ne” should strictly be neutral, but here it seems he has bent that rule]

de(h)inc ut quiescant porro moneo et desinant
= hence/so [in logic] I advise that henceforth they cease and desist their abuse

Hope some of this is useful.


Keep up the good work!
 

Matthaeus

Vemortuicida strenuus
Faciuntne intellegendo ut nihil intellegant?
= As for understanding, don’t they behave as if they understood nothing?
[although I think that “–ne” should strictly be neutral, but here it seems he has bent that rule]
How did you arrive at that translation? I'm still puzzled...
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
Faciuntne intellegendo ut nihil intellegant?
= As for understanding, don’t they behave as if they understood nothing?
No, ut there introduces a result clause. Matthaeus's translation is right. The ablative gerund implies means, "by understanding", not something like "as for understanding".
 

limetrees

Civis Illustris
I was going to say
Ut + subj = like one who
Tarquinius ad jus regni nihil praeter vim habebat, ut qui neque populi jussu, neque auctoribus patribus regnaret
Lewis and short “ut” 1:B:4:c
(and that Terence has dropped the relative here)

And

On “intellegendo”, ablative of respect of the gerund (is this possible?)

BUT
ablative of means and then verb and result, as you have done [“By their understanding don’t they make it so that they understand nothing”] is becoming ever more appealing.

I feel like those critics.
 

limetrees

Civis Illustris
Lines 28-29

paucis te volo =
I want a word with you (Lewis&Short volo.I.E.2 (I want you for a few (words/moments))
[not the same as “I’ve got to talk to you”, again a minor English thing]

dictum puta:
nempe ut curentur recte haec? =


Say no more [consider it said] ; I suppose you want these things seen to.
 

Matthaeus

Vemortuicida strenuus
so,
consider it said: [I suppose] you want these things rightly seen to?
 

limetrees

Civis Illustris
I'm putting "I suppose" for the "nempe" (obviously/clearly etc.)
and "Say no more" is the more idiomatic phrase.
"rightly seen to" sounds odd also ; if you want to keep the "recte" perhaps "properly"

so
Say no more; I suppose you want these things seen to properly.

It depends though: are ye doing a literal version, like a student would read as a crib, or a close but performable version?
 

Matthaeus

Vemortuicida strenuus
We're going for idiomatic English, but staying close to the original. Thanks for your suggestions!
 
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