That is good for her

The context here is that a person is in a good situation. They are in a beneficial place in life. with that in mind I know in English(American at least) we have lost sight of the distinction between adjectives and adverbs. Is "eī est bonus"(or maybe bonum) or "ei est bene" the best here?
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
Ei est bonum is grammatically correct. Not so with bonus in this context, because we're not talking about a man or masculine thing being good for her. However, even if it makes sense in theory, I'm not sure ei est bonum would be the most natural way to express the idea.

Ei est bene is a correct sentence, but would usually mean "things are fine for her", "she's fine", "she's doing well".
 
What would be a more natural way, do you think. the specific sentence is She is in wal-mart that is a good thing for her.
If there is a more idiomatic way of expressing this idea, I would prefer my students learn it from the beginning.
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
Its just a simple story to help the students learn esse. In the demo class I took (which was in German) the construction is good for/ is not good for was used frequently. so I was going off of that and thought it would be a good way to introduce bonus and malus. So the idea is that being in Wal-Mart is a good thing (it is beneficial to them, they like it, they are better off there than somewhere else) to be in Wal-Mart but not Dollar General(which I Latinized to Thalerus Generālis) If est eī bonum is not a very Latin way of expressing the idea, then I can introduce bonus another way.
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
Yes, if your students are only at the stage of learning how to use esse, bonus and malus, it's probably better to start with simpler things (not go into complex matters of idiom yet).
 
So eī est bonum would be appropriate for a small child's language, but a more sophisticated way would come to them as the read and hear more real Latin?
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
What I would suggest at this stage would be to drop the "good for her" idea altogether, and introduce esse, bonus and malus in simpler, safer ways. It's not really a good idea to give your students bad habits by teaching them a doubtful phrase.
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
I don't really know. A common way to say that something is good for someone is to use the verb prosum, but I'm not sure it would work here. For instance, I can't quite see it being used as an exclamation like "She's in Wal-Mart. Oh, good for her!" The lack of a larger context doesn't help me to figure things out.
 
I understand. Unfortunately there really isn't much of a larger context. its really just a statement of fact. It looks like prosum is the closest, but I'm just going to have the store itself be good or bad. Ill wait for the other
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
If you're just plainly stating that being in Wal-Mart is beneficial to her, then prosum should work just fine. What I'm unsure of is how to translate the phrase if it's being used in a more idiomatic way, if you see what I mean.
 
Yeah, its pretty straight forward. no subtext here. As long as prosum will extend to broader application as well. It looks like it would be pretty common
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
That's fine.
 

Bitmap

Civis Illustris
Some Americans use that phrase, "good for XY", rather often and idiomatically (meaning something like "well done by XY, but who cares?") ... but in a way that doesn't really lend itself to a direct translation into Latin.
 
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