That's Nurse Motherf#@ker to you.

Mark D

New Member
I am an Emergency Department Nurse. One shift a drunken patient repeatedly called me motherf#@ker throughout his stay. I finally told him "that's Nurse Motherf#@ker to you. I didn't get a degree to just be called Motherf#@ker." I said it loud enough that the whole unit heard me. It has become a legend of sorts. My wife tried to buy vanity plates for my car that said NURSEMF. However the censors said no. I think this would make a good tattoo. Any translation help is appreciated.

Mark
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
I'm afraid that may be untranslatable into Latin. You can wait a bit and see if anyone has an idea for an adaptation (I don't right now) but in any case don't expect anything too exact.
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
While there's no Latin insult that means exactly the word you used, it could be replaced by another one. I'm thinking of one in particular which means "d*k s*er" (those asterisks feel ridiculous, but I'm applying my own advice and being careful as to the mods' potential reaction) which is found in some Pompeian graffiti.

A big problem, however, is how to translate "nurse", for which the Romans had no word. The closest I can think of is the word for physician... I suppose it may be that there's a neo-Latin word for "nurse", but I don't know.
 

rothbard

Civis Illustris
Staff member
This excellent site gives the following alternatives: nosocomus, attested in the Justinian Code, infirmiarius from DuCange, and aegrorum minister in the Lexicon Recentis Latinitatis. Below is the full entry:

med nurse / Krankenfleger(in): nosocomus (v. nosocoma) [Cod. Just.]; infirmarius+ (v. infirmaria+) [DuCange] (Helf.) ]] aegrorum minister (v. ministra) (LRL) ]] nosocoma (Alb. I) ]] valetudinaria (eccl.) ]] famula (or ancilla) infirmorum (Lev.)
 
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