The Correction Thread

paruos

Civis Illustris
Or
"THE CORRECTION THREAD ~ FOR THOSE WHO WISH TO BE CORRECTED AND FOR THOSE WHO HAVE A GOOD WILL IN DOING SO!"

Hello everybody!

I decided to begin this thread because I'm very interested in practising and improving my Latin :)

So, as Quasus set the "LITTERAE DIVRNAE" thread, we talked about it, and it came up that it might get boring to make corrections along the same thread, so, I'm making this thread, so as to open space for comments on what we write, whenever the author wishes to be corrected. (It's very important to wait people ask to be corrected, because each one learns in his own method and rythm.)

I'll insert in my signature, as soon as I can, that whoever wishes to make corrections, to do so in this specific thread, so as to make things more ... neat, in our forum! :) We all wish a good place to be, talk, learn, discuss, and chat.

(And, if any moderators think it proper to move this thread somewhere else, close it to open a new version, or something else, please, feel free to do so, let us know. We're moving ahead, here, according to our needs, and the tools the forum offers, but moderators have the vision of what the forum should be, better than us and better to all of us.)

Lets hope many people profit of this laboratorium! :D
See you around!

Paruos
 

paruos

Civis Illustris
Quasus dixit:
Dum cōnsilior tibi, parue, ut (per)paucī prō *gēns pauca scrībās.
paruos dixit:
Dan Brown Angels and Demons ante The Da Vinci Code scripsit, sed gentes paucae hoc sciunt, quia secundus ad theatrum it ante primum.
Lets try it again, Quasus. Right way of saying would then be "Dan Brown A&D ante TDVC scripsit, sed gens pauca hoc scit, quia ...". Like this, or does the verb come in a plural form? ( :shifty2: ) I got confused, here :doh: ... haha!

Thanks for saying so, by the way! :) I want to learn!

P~
 

Quasus

Civis Illustris
paruos dixit:
Lets try it again, Quasus. Right way of saying would then be "Dan Brown A&D ante TDVC scripsit, sed gens pauca hoc scit, quia ...". Like this, or do the verb comes in a plural form? ( :shifty2: ) I got confused, here :doh: ... haha!
P~
You just use paucī for few people and perpaucī for very few people. Thus we have: ... sed paucī sciunt... After sciunt you need an a.c.i., so I'd say
... sed paucī sciunt posteriōrem ante priōrem ad theātrum īsse.
(This circumlocution for making a screen version may be dubious, but the Romans had no cinema anyway.)
 

paruos

Civis Illustris
Dan Brown A&D ante TDVC scripsit, sed paucí sciunt posteriórem ante priórem ad theátrum ísse.

This does solve the matter ... :)
 

Chamaeleo

New Member
Haha, «pouca gente». Nōlī lūsitāne scrībere! ;) «Paucī» dīcitur.

«Gens» é uma tribo, uma raça!
 

paruos

Civis Illustris
CHAMÆLEO dixit:
Haha, «pouca gente». Nōlī lūsitāne scrībere! ;) «Paucī» dīcitur.

«Gens» é uma tribo, uma raça!
Haha! Indeed, I can see too much Portuguese, in my Latin yet.

It's one big difficulty for Romance language native speakers, not to speak their tongues in Latin words ... :wondering:

(And I haven't managed to download Evan Millner's (from SCHOLA.ning) audio lessons on Adler yet, so ... I've booked for next Saturday but, once I'm changing jobs, possibly I'll manage to do it before. (I'll have a couple of free mornings, I hope, next couple of weeks.)

Your Portuguese is good ... Is it yours or Babelfish's (which I boubt ...). I hear around that you're from Poland? :-s :? :mrgreen:

See ye!

P~
 

Chamaeleo

New Member
paruos dixit:
Your Portuguese is good ... Is it yours or Babelfish's (which I boubt ...). I hear around that you're from Poland? :-s :? :mrgreen:
No, that's Mattheus. I'm from London.

I teach Romance languages (French, Italian & Spanish) for a living, and I did a semester of Portuguese at university. It's enough to get by.
 

Matthaeus

Vemortuicida strenuus
Maybe you could land a job teaching Latin? Wouldn't that be awesome? Since the level of teaching sucks everywhere, you could show students real enthusiasm for the language.
 

Chamaeleo

New Member
Actually, I recently decided that my Latin had improved to a level at which it was good enough for me to add it to my list of languages in my advertisements. Within a week, I got an enquiry from someone who wanted lessons in English, French and Latin. It was Latin that clinched the deal, because it's so hard to find Latin tutors around here. We will be starting next week. I wouldn't dare to teach Latin at any sort of advanced level, but I feel quite confident that I will be able to help this schoolkid with the basic conjugation and declension stuff that they do at school.
 

Iohannes Aurum

Technicus Auxiliarius
In other words, students would learn enough to translate mottoes, tattoos, and short messages, but not enough to read Cicero et al. Most who want to learn Latin do not care about Cicero et al., but are more interested in writing messages that few understand (in other words, secret messages) or knowing what a particular phrase meant.
 

Bitmap

Civis Illustris
Translating Cicero into your mother tongue is not advanced level.
 

Quasus

Civis Illustris
paruos dixit:
quia neutrum non est, sed ex religione. Anglicum "face" utor. uultulus melius uerbum quam auatara, puto.
Fortāsse religiōsum melius sit quam ē religiōne? Rōmānī saepissimē adjectīvīs ūtēbantur.
Anglicum -> Anglicō (sc. verbō) aut Anglicē (adv.)
Parue, meā sentenitā, verbō putāre nōnnumquam abūteris. Fortāsse hīc verbum arbitror melius sit.

paruos dixit:
:D denuo audiar, Saturni diei. gratus sum et ego, ut Quasus. sed, ut Quasus, ad id agere instrumenta non habeo :( ... (nondum ...)
audiar -> audiam
Quasus -> Mattheus :D
ad id agere -> ad id faciendum
īnstrumenta nōn habeō rēctum est, sed īnstrumenta mihi dēsunt classicius sonat.
 

paruos

Civis Illustris
Whoa!, I'm getting dizzy here! ... Evan Millner said it was going to happen, haha! :D

By the way, thanks for giving comments in Latin. I think (arbitror) you were sensible enough to realize that I'm in GREAT need of reading. (And this is an excellent reading to me! :mrgreen: )

P~

----
ps. I think I'll mistake you less with Mattheus :doh: when you both get "avatars" :roll:
 

Chamaeleo

New Member
paruos dixit:
ps. I think I'll mistake you less with Mattheus :doh: when you both get "avatars" :roll:
I'll second that!

Both of you, get yourselves to Meez.com and generate a cute picture of yourselves — now!
 

Quasus

Civis Illustris
paruos dixit:
By the way, thanks for giving comments in Latin. I think (arbitror) you were sensible enough to realize that I'm in GREAT need of reading. (And this is an excellent reading to me! :mrgreen: )
You know, only half a year ago I could hardly join a couple of sentences in Latin. So now when I see that I can express myself, I get a kind of euphoria. :D
 

Nooj

Civis Illustris
In via Caesariam

meus Deus, meus Deus, utinam ne haec umquam desinant
harenae et mare
murmur aquarum
fulmen caeli
prex hominis

ab opere Hannah Szenes translatum est. quid arbitramini?
 

Alcuin

New Member
Hanc operam nescio, sed si intentiones tuas recte intellexerim, unam correctionem faciam. Quoniam subjunctivus casus non [future tense; don't know the latin for that] habet, fortasse mavis subjunctivo ut imperativo [?] uti? Tum scribas,
"Meus Deus, Meus Deus, desinant haec numquam..."

modo sententia mea est--sed semper quacumque tibi placet, fac ita.
 

Bitmap

Civis Illustris
Nooj dixit:
In via Caesariam
I think it's better to link adverbial expression (like the direction 'to Caesaria') to verbs; that makes it a bit easier to understand and sounds more like proper Latin to me. In this case that would give you "in via Caesariam facienda".

meus Deus, meus Deus,
the vocative of meus is mi

utinam ne haec umquam desinant
I only know desino in connection with infinitives in the meaning of "to stop doing something". I would personally have chosen finio here.

ab opere Hannah Szenes translatum est. quid arbitramini?
If you care about classical Latin, you should translate "translate" by "vertere". "Transferre" is post-classical.

Alcuin dixit:
Tum scribas,
"Meus Deus, Meus Deus, desinant haec numquam..."
No idea what you're talking about
 

Alcuin

New Member
1. I suspect you're drawing "meus Deus" from the Vulgate, no? I'm 90% sure Jerome, probably because the Greek was in the nominative rather than vocative, translates Jesus' cry from the cross ("Eloi, Eloi, llama sabachtani," or something like that) as "Deus meus." Just a thought; "mi" is definitely the correct vocative.

2. Bitmap, I was suggesting that one might effectively employ a jussive subjunctive rather than a construction involving "utinam ne," since the clause seems to carry a future or forward-looking meaning, but the subjunctive has no future tense. Thus,

"Desinant numquam haec" (let these [things] never cease)

rather than

"Utinam ne haec umquam desinant" (would that these [things] not ever cease)

Or maybe I'm just taking crazy pills. If that's so, feel free to tell me.
 
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