The Date in Latin

Philosophiae

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I would like to know if my dates are correct:

8-12-2011
or
A.D.DuoDecimus Augustus Duo Milia Undecim
or
A.D.XII VER ↀↀXI
or
A.D.Purdie Idus VER

3-21-1931
or
A.D. Vicesimus Primus Mártius Mille Nongenti Triginta Unus
or
A.D.XXI FLA ↀDCCCXXXI
 

cinefactus

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There are several ways of expressing dates in Latin depending on what time period you are interested in. Even if we stick to AD rather than AUC, 12 Aug could be

ante diem sextum Idus Augustas in the Roman Calendar (ad VI Id Aug)
octavo die Augusti (AD) MMXI (meaning on the 8th day)
sexta feria ante Assumptionem Mariae AD MMXI

March 21 1931
ante diem duodecimum Kalendas Apriles MCMXXXI (a.d. XII Kal. Apr. MMDCLXXXIV)
a.d. XII Kal. Apr. MCMXXXI
uno et vincesimo die Martii MCMXXXI
 

Philosophiae

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For 8-12-2011:
I do not get sextum. It should be DuoDecimum.
I do not get octavo. It should be twelveth day of Augusti something similar to "duodecim".
I do not get Idus. Idus falls on the 13th of the month and 15th in March, May, July and October
And "sexta feria ante Assumptionem Mariae AD MMXI" needs alot of explanation.

For 3-21-2011:
I get A.D.=ante diem. What is B.C.?
I do not get DuoDecimum. It should be Vicesimus Primum.
I do not get Kalendas. Kalendas means the first of the month I think.
I also do not get Apriles when it is March

My Abreviations for the months are not quite right. I think.
 

cinefactus

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Philosophiae dixit:
For 8-12-2011:
I do not get sextum. It should be DuoDecimum.
I do not get octavo. It should be twelveth day of Augusti something similar to "duodecim".
I do not get Idus. Idus falls on the 13th of the month and 15th in March, May, July and October
And "sexta feria ante Assumptionem Mariae AD MMXI" needs alot of explanation.
Sorry, the American dating convention threw me out.
If you want the Roman system it is pridie, not purdie
pridie Idus Augustas MCMXXXI or prid Id. Aug. MCMXXXI
which would be duodecimo die Augusti
During the middle ages they used liturgical dating, so the sexta feria, is the Friday before the Assumption of Mary. As I said, there are many ways of writing dates in Latin, depending on which period you are looking at.

Philosophiae dixit:
For 3-21-2011:
I get A.D.=ante diem. What is B.C.?
I do not get DuoDecimum. It should be Vicesimus Primum.
I do not get Kalendas. Kalendas means the first of the month I think.
I also do not get Apriles when it is March
ante diem should be a.d.
A.D is Anno Domini. B.C. is Before Christ
The Romans counted backwards for dates, so 21 March is 12 days before the Kalends of April (using the Roman inclusive counting system)
[edit, digging out a better ref]
vicesimo primo die Martii is on the 21st day of March
 

Imber Ranae

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Philosophiae dixit:
I would like to know if my dates are correct:

8-12-2011
or
A.D.DuoDecimus Augustus Duo Milia Undecim
or
A.D.XII VER ↀↀXI
or
A.D.Purdie Idus VER

3-21-1931
or
A.D. Vicesimus Primus Mártius Mille Nongenti Triginta Unus
or
A.D.XXI FLA ↀDCCCXXXI
You calculated the days correctly, but the rest is pretty screwy.

Does A.D. stand for ante diem or anno Domini? If the former, it shouldn't exist before pridie (not "purdie"). If the latter, it should really go before the year itself, not the day.

I have no idea what "VER" is meant to stand for.

Cinefactus dixit:
There are several ways of expressing dates in Latin depending on what time period you are interested in. Even if we stick to AD rather than AUC, 12 Aug could be

ante diem sextum Idus Augustas in the Roman Calendar (ad VI Id Aug)
octavo die Augusti (AD) MMXI (meaning on the 8th day)
sexta feria ante Assumptionem Mariae AD MMXI
I think the American Month-Day arrangement screwed you up somewhere. He wants the twelfth of August, not the eighth. Also, for the Roman reckoning you need to indicate the succeeding month. [never mind...you did it right]

Modern Reckoning:

  • [die] duodecimo [mensis] Augusti [anno Domini] bis millesimo undecimo

    Abbreviated: XII Aug. MMXI

Roman reckoning:

  • pridie Idus Augustas/Sextiles [anno Domini] bis millesimo undecimo

    Abbreviated: pr. Id. Aug./Sex. MMXI

March 21 1931
ante diem duodecimum Kalendas Apriles MCMXXXI (a.d. XII Kal. Apr. MMDCLXXXIV)
a.d. XII Kal. Apr. MCMXXXI
uno et vincesimo die Martii MCMXXXI
This is correct, though if you use a.u.c. it should be made explicit, e.g. a.u.c. MMDCLXXXIV. (This is assuming you calculated a.u.c. correctly; I haven't bothered to learn it myself.)

Modern Reckoning:

  • [die] vicesimo primo [mensis] Martii [anno Domini] millesimo nongentesimo tricesimo primo

    Abbreviated: XXI Mar. MCMXXXI

Roman reckoning:

  • ante diem duodecimum Kalendas Apriles [anno Domini] millesimo nongentesimo tricesimo primo / [anno] ab urbe condita bis millesimo sescentesimo octogesimo quarto

    Abbreviated: a.d. XII Kal. Apr. MCMXXXI / a.u.c. MMDCLXXXIV
 

cinefactus

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Just to summarise. Our year dating system, ie 2011, is Anno Domini (or more politically correct CE)
The Romans used AUC, which is from the founding of the city.

For the days the Romans used a system counting backwards from the next Kalends, Ides or Nones
We use a system counting forwards from the 1st of the month
In the mediaeval period people used both of these, as well as dating from important church events.

The form of the date will change, depending on what you are trying to say. Usually you see the ablative used, meaning on the ....

So can you tell us more about exactly what you are trying to convey by 12 Aug 2011, and how you want to express it?
 

Puer Pedens

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Die vicesimo primo mensis octobris anno bis millesimo vicesimo primo. (10-21-2021)

But my question is: I know that Dies, diei can be either masculine or feminine, what if I write it this way, Die vicesima prima mensis octobris anno bis millesimo vicesimo primo is it ok?!
 
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