The queen loves the great forest et cetera

KarlaUK

Active Member
Hi all
Please will anyone help check my translations in to basic Latin to assist my self-learning.
Exercises are from W Gardner Hale's First Latin Book. I have underlined those words where I am unsure on the appropriate word order. A comment on these whether wrong or right would be much appreciated as would highlighting any macron errors.

The queen loves the great forest.
Rēgīna silvam magnam amat.

My villa is near (to) the splendid villa of the queen, But the queen is unfriendly toward me.
Villa mea villae splendidae rēgīnae propinqua est. Sed rēgīna mihi inimīca est.

My friend, why is the queen always so opposed to you? Why is she angry at (toward) you?
Rēgīna, amīca mea, tibi cūr semper tam adversa est? Tibi cūr īrāta est?

My daughter gives (to) me a letter.
Fīlia mea mihi epistulam dat.

Your letter is pleasing to me.
Epistula tua mihi grāta est.

The mistress is dining. The dinner is good.
Domina cēnat. Cēna bona est.

Many thanks
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
The queen loves the great forest.
Rēgīna silvam magnam amat.
Good.
My villa is near (to) the splendid villa of the queen, But the queen is unfriendly toward me.
Villa mea villae splendidae rēgīnae propinqua est. Sed rēgīna mihi inimīca est.
That is correct, but ambiguous as to whether splendidae goes with villae or reginae. You could make it less ambiguous by using the word order splendidae villae reginae.
My friend, why is the queen always so opposed to you? Why is she angry at (toward) you?
Rēgīna, amīca mea, tibi cūr semper tam adversa est? Tibi cūr īrāta est?
That is correct as well, but the word order puts strong emphasis on regina and tibi by putting them before cur.

Mea
isn't really necessary.
My daughter gives (to) me a letter.
Fīlia mea mihi epistulam dat.
Good.
Your letter is pleasing to me.
Epistula tua mihi grāta est.
Good.
The mistress is dining. The dinner is good.
Domina cēnat. Cēna bona est.
Good.
 

KarlaUK

Active Member
Thanks @Pacifica very helpful as I was confused about where to put words marked and got the wrong emphasis.
My villa is near (to) the splendid villa of the queen, But the queen is unfriendly toward me.
Villa mea villae splendidae rēgīnae propinqua est. Sed rēgīna mihi inimīca est.
That is correct, but ambiguous as to whether splendidae goes with villae or reginae. You could make it less ambiguous by using the word order splendidae villae reginae.
I was trying to put reginae in the correct place and didn't think about how it might be modified by splendidae, at all! So, is it best to move the adjective and keep the genitive of possession close with respect to the noun modified, if needed, in general?
My friend, why is the queen always so opposed to you? Why is she angry at (toward) you?
Rēgīna, amīca mea, tibi cūr semper tam adversa est? Tibi cūr īrāta est?
That is correct as well, but the word order puts strong emphasis on regina and tibi by putting them before cur.
Mea isn't really necessary.
So, you are saying what I wrote was similar to
My friend, why is the queen always so opposed to you? Why is she angry at (toward) you?​
Is this better? I've kept a standard statement word order and tacked cūr on the front.

My friend, why is the queen always so opposed to you? Why is she angry at (toward) you?​
Cūr, amīca, rēgīna tibi semper tam adversa est? Cūr tibi īrāta est?​
Or, should rēgīna also come before amīca? It doesn't look or sound quite right to me.
Cūr rēgīna, amīca, tibi semper tam adversa est?​
 
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KarlaUK

Active Member
Another exercise but this time Latin to English.
Please will anyone help check my translations from basic textbook Latin into English to assist my self-learning.
Exercises are from W Gardner Hale's First Latin Book. A short comment on these whether wrong or right would be much appreciated.

Section 68
1. Fīliam tuam, rēgīna mea, laudō. Bona est et benigna.
I praise your daughter, my queen. She is good and kind.

2. Amō rēgīnae fīliam; sed rēgīnae nōn grāta sum. Mihi dūra est.
I love the queen's daughter; but I am not pleasing to the queen. She is stern towards me.

3. Rēgīna mihi semper benigna est. Tibi cūr tam inimīca est?
The queen is always kind to me. Why is she so unfriendly towards you?

4. Domina mea rēgīnae cēnam magnam dat.
My mistress is giving a big dinner for the queen.

5. (The mistress says) Rēgīna, coqua, cēnam meam nōn laudat. Culpa tua est. Tibi īrāta sum.
Cook, the queen is not praising my dinner. The blame is yours. I am angry with (at in US Eng) you.

6. Villa amīcae meae silvae pulchrae propinque propinqua est. (thanks for pointing that out, @Bitmap)
My friend's villa is near the beautiful forest.

7. Epistula tua mihi nōn grāta est. Tibi īrāta sum.
Your letter is not pleasing to me. I am angry with you.
 
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Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
I was trying to put reginae in the correct place and didn't think about how it might be modified by splendidae, at all! So, is it best to move the adjective and keep the genitive of possession close with respect to the noun modified, if needed, in general?
I suppose so, if by "if needed" you mean in this sort of ambiguous situation.
So, you are saying what I wrote was similar to
My friend, why is the queen always so opposed to you? Why is she angry at (toward) you?
Yes, something like that, or even, "As for the queen, why is she always so opposed to you? ..."
Is this better? I've kept a standard statement word order and tacked cūr on the front.

My friend, why is the queen always so opposed to you? Why is she angry at (toward) you?Cūr, amīca, rēgīna tibi semper tam adversa est? Cūr tibi īrāta est?
It is not necessarily better, as that would ultimately depend on context, but it's a more neutral word order.
Or, should rēgīna also come before amīca? It doesn't look or sound quite right to me.
Cūr rēgīna, amīca, tibi semper tam adversa est?
That is also a possible word order.

Your new exercises are correct, as Bitmap said.
3. Rēgīna mihi semper benigna est. Tibi cūr tam inimīca est?
The queen is always kind to me. Why is she so unfriendly towards you?
See, here tibi comes before cur because it's emphasized, with "you" being opposed to "me"; it's like "The queen is always kind to me. (But when it comes to you, on the other hand...) why is she so unfriendly towards you?"
 
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KarlaUK

Active Member
@Pacifica
Thanks for the analysis of my attempts at basic Latin. I have a lot of subtle points on syntax there to keep in mind going forward. Good foundations to help when things get tougher, I trust!
I have another set of translations to post. The speed of posting will slow down as more grammatical points and vocabulary are introduced. I am currently covering ground in writing that I usually do in my head. It extends my spelling and should enhance my pronunciation if I keep up with the macrons.
 

KarlaUK

Active Member
Please will anyone help check my translations in to basic Latin to assist my self-learning.
Exercises are from W Gardner Hale's First Latin Book. I have underlined those words where I am unsure on the appropriate word order. A comment on these whether wrong or right would be much appreciated as would highlighting any macron errors.

Section 69
1. Your mistress is kind to you. Mine is always angry at me.
Domina tua tibi benigna est. Mea mihi semper īrāta est.

2. (Mistress) Cook, I do not praise your dinner. It is (a) big (one); good it is not. Why is it not good? (Cook) The fault is mine, mistress. I am not a good cook.
Cēnam tuam, coqua, nōn laudō. Magna est; nōn est bona. Cūr bona nōn est? Culpa, domina, mea est. Coqua bona nōn sum. - Not sure if dinner is implicit by context in the 2nd sentence.

3. The villa of the queen's daughter is near (to) mine. It is a splendid villa.
Villa fīliae rēgīnae meae propinqua est. Splendida est. - or should it be Villa splendid est?

4. I am angry at the daughter of the queen. She is always opposed to me.
Fīliae rēgīnae īrāta sum. Mihi semper adversa est.

5. Your letter, my friend, is not agreeable to me.
Epistula tua, amīca, mihi nōn grāta est.
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
No real mistakes there.
Not sure if dinner is implicit by context in the 2nd sentence.
It is.
Villa fīliae rēgīnae meae propinqua est.
Maybe, to avoid ambiguity: filiae reginae villa meae propinqua est.
or should it be Villa splendid est?
Well, splendida est means "it is splendid", and it's understood from the context that "it" is the villa of the queen's daughter, as it's natural to assume that the subject of the second sentence is the same as that of the first. If splendida referred to the queen or her daughter, then you'd really need to add regina or filia to make it clear, or if it referred to your villa, then you'd say mea. However, there's no harm in translating "It is a splendid villa" more literally as villa splendida est.
 
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KarlaUK

Active Member
Thanks, @Pacifica. I get them :)

3. The villa of the queen's daughter is near (to) mine...
Villa fīliae rēgīnae meae propinqua est.
Maybe, to avoid ambiguity: filiae reginae villa meae propinqua est.
I see. I guess my translation could be interpreted as the The daughter's villa is near to my queen. Or even The villa is near to my queen's daughter.
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
I see. I guess my translation could be interpreted as the The daughter's villa is near to my queen. Or even The villa is near to my queen's daughter.
It could theoretically mean those things, yes, but they aren't very likely things to say. I was thinking there might be more risk of it being read as "The villa of my queen's daughter is near".
 

KarlaUK

Active Member
Another exercise but this time Latin to English.
Please will anyone help check my translations from basic textbook Latin into English to assist my self-learning.
Exercises are from W Gardner Hale's First Latin Book. A short comment on these whether wrong or right would be much appreciated.

Section 75
1. Iūlia hīc est? In culīnā est.
Is Julia in here? She's in the kitchen.

2. Domina ā villā abest. Ubi est? In silvā est. Ubi silva est? Silva villae propinqau est.
The mistress is away from the villa. Where is she? She's in the wood. Where is the wood? The wood is near the villa.

3. Rēgīna hodiē cum fīliā meā cēnat. Amat rēgīna filiam tuam; meae inimīca est.
The queen is dining with my daughter, today. The queen loves your daughter; she is unfriendly to mine.

4. Ubi domina tua est? In silvā cum amīcā ambulat. Silvam amat. Mea quoque domina silvam amat et ibi saepe ambulat.
Where is your mistress? She's walking in the forest with a (her) friend. She loves the forest. My mistress also loves the forest and often walks there.
 

KarlaUK

Active Member
@Bitmap
Thank you, feedback makes things so must easier. English to Latin next again. A little harder, I tend to miss ambiguities.

Please will anyone help check my translations into basic Latin to assist my self-learning.
Exercises are from W Gardner Hale's First Latin Book. I have underlined those words where I am unsure on the appropriate word order or conjugation. A comment on these whether wrong or right would be much appreciated as would highlighting any macron errors.

Section 76
1. Where is your mistress? Is she here? She is in the kitchen with the cook.
Ubi Ubī domina tua est? Hīc est? In culinā culīnā cum coquā est.

2. Why is your daughter absent from the villa? She is dining today with the daughter of the queen.
Cūr fīlia tua ā villā abest? Hodīe cum fīliā rēgīnae cēnat.

3. My friend's villa is near a great forest, where I often walk. I love the forest.
Amīca mea silvae magnae propinqua est, ubi ubī saepe ambulō. Amō silvam.

4. My daughter also loves the forest, and often walks there.
Mea quoque fīlia silvam amat, et ibi ibī saepe ambulat.

My daughter also loves the forest, and often walks there.
Fīlia mea quoque silvam amat, et ibi ibī saepe ambulat.

Edited to correct macrons only.
 
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Bitmap

Civis Illustris
Section 76
1. Where is your mistress? Is she here? She is in the kitchen with the cook.
Ubi domina tua est? Hīc est? In culinā cum coquā est.
That's right.
Macrons: The i in culina is long. The i in ubi is long as well (at least that's how you would find it in the dictionary. It could also be short in colloquial Latin).

2. Why is your daughter absent from the villa? She is dining today with the daughter of the queen.
Cūr fīlia tua ā villā abest? Hodīe cum fīliā rēgīnae cēnat.
That's right. I don't know why you are unsure about filia reginae. The way you put it is the most common, but reginae filia would also be ok.

3. My friend's villa is near a great forest, where I often walk. I love the forest.
Amīca mea silvae magnae propinqua est, ubi saepe ambulō. Amō silvam.
My friend's villa is near the great forest, not my friend ;)
Macron in ubi: see 1st sentence.

4. My daughter also loves the forest, and often walks there.
Mea quoque fīlia silvam amat, et ibi saepe ambulat.
Macrons: ibi works like ubi (second i should technically be long).

My daughter also loves the forest, and often walks there.
Fīlia mea quoque silvam amat, et ibi saepe ambulat.
quoque is a rather emphatic word for "also" that usually attaches itself to a single word rather than a full expression. That's why your textbook examples usually chose the word order mea quoque filia. It puts a lot of emphasis on the "my ... too" aspect. If you want a weaker word that also means "also", you can use etiam: etiam filia mea silvam amat.
 

KarlaUK

Active Member
@Bitmap: Superb! Thank you so much.

Missing out a whole word takes skilI, don't ya know? :rolleyes::D
It does, usefully, point out my linear translation style and translation approach needs to be refined at this early stage to avoid problems later.
The explanation re quoque covers my query! I will correct macrons on ubī & ibī- The book I am using doesn't mark them; culīna was my eyesight.
KarlaUK dixit:
3. My friend's villa is near a great forest, where I often walk. I love the forest.
Amīca mea silvae magnae propinqua est, ubi saepe ambulō. Amō silvam.
My friend's villa is near the great forest, not my friend ;)...
Villa amīcae meae silvae magnae propinqua est,... I'm presuming here that no-one will think it is my great forest unless I, the narrator, is from the good and the great, but, in instances where there may be confusion, would

Amīcae meae villa silvae magnae propinqua est,... be better?
 
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Bitmap

Civis Illustris
I will correct macrons on ubī & ibī- The book I am using doesn't mark them
It is not a big deal, you can also follow your book's convention.
In theory, the second syllable in those words should be long, but there is a phenomenon in Latin called "iambic shortening", which allows the last syllable of such two-syllable words with a short first syllable to be either long or short. That's probably nothing that is really relevant for your stage of learning, though ;)

Villa amīcae meae silvae magnae propinqua est,... I'm presuming here that no-one will think it is my great forest unless I, the narrator, is from the good and the great, but, in instances where there may be confusion, would

Amīcae meae villa silvae magnae propinqua est,... be better?
If you follow the conventional word order, you shouldn't worry about confusion too much. There is such a thing as grammar expectancy (not only in Latin, but in all languages). A regular reader who knows Latin well will just expect the meae to go with amicae and then the next word group to be something independent. If the speaker of the sentence wants to construct something unusual like taking meae with silvae, you would expect him or her to do so by changing the word order away from the conventional one, e.g. villa amicae propinqua est meae silvae magnae.
 

KarlaUK

Active Member
Another exercise but this time Latin to English.
Please will anyone help check my translations from basic textbook Latin into English to assist my self-learning.
Exercises are from W Gardner Hale's First Latin Book. A short comment on these whether wrong or right would be much appreciated.

Section 82
1. Fīlia tua hodiē hīc est? Ā villā abest. In silvā cum amīcā ambulat. Mea quoque fīlia ibī nunc ambulat.
Is your daughter here, today? She's away from the villa. She's walking with a friend in the forest. My daughter is walking there, too, now. (or At the moment, my daughter is walking there, too.)

2. Ubī Iūlia coqua est? In culinā nōn est. Ad casam amīcae ambulat. Ubī casa est? Est ad silvam? Trāns silvam amīca habitat. Nunc per silvam cocqau ambulat.
Where is Julia, the cook? She's not in the kitchen. She's walking to the cottage of her friend. Where is the cottage? Is it by the forest? Her friend lives beyond the forest. At this moment, the cook is walking through the forest.

3. Villa mea ante silvam magnam est. Fīlia tua saepe in silvā ambulat? Saepe ā villā ad silvam ambulat; sed in silvam nōn ambulat. Fīlia parva est, silva magna.
My villa is in front of the great forest. Does your daughter often walk in the forest? Often, she walks from the villa towards the forest, but she doesn't walk into the forest. My daughter is small, the forest is big.

4. Ubī amīca tua habitat. Post silvam habitat.
Where does your friend live? She lives behind the wood.
 
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