The Qur'an in Latin

Nooj

Civis Illustris
I admit that I read religious texts like the Vulgate not because I'm interested as such in the message (I'm an atheist), but because it helps improve my Latin. But I guess it also helps in understanding the text better. To this end, I was wondering if there was a Latin translation of the Qur'an? I do own an English copy of the Qur'an, but I can't seem to find any Latin copy on the internet.
 

Interficio

Civis Illustris
I sincerely doubt it. As Latin is normally associated with christianity. It would be like trying to find a physics book in a dog's language. lol.
 

QMF

Civis Illustris
A little insulting to the Qu'ran, Interficio, but I agree with the sentiment. It doesn't seem very likely that the Qu'ran has been translated into Latin by any major translator figure, because during the Medieval age, Islam was essentially blasphemy. Attempting to translate it would likely mean your death at that time. And more recently it's been less culturally relevant than it was then, making it even less likely that the task has been done in more recent years.

It would be an interesting project, however, most certainly. Especially if it was done straight from the Arabic.
 

nequam

Civis Illustris
I hear tell it's not even allowed to be translated?

Like the Bible so very long ago.
 

Imber Ranae

Ranunculus Iracundus
Of course there are Latin translations of the Qur'an! The first known translation of the Qu'ran into any European language was in fact a 12th century Latin text, although according to Islamic tradition a Greek translation was presented to the Byzantine Emperor Heraclius in the 7th Century. European scholars of the time were tremendously eager to translate all of the scientific and religious literature they could get from the East. Much of ancient Greek philosophy and medicine was first reintroduced to Western Europe via Arabic translations, and in some cases the original Greek texts weren't known or used in the West until the Renaissance. There was a lot of original Islamic scientific and medical literature being translated into Latin then as well.

European interest in Arabic religous texts was mostly driven by a Christian desire to counter Islam, of course. It's not so surprising, then, that the first Latin translation of the Qur'an, made by the 12th century English theologian Robert of Ketton, was called Lex Mahumet Pseudoprophete or "Law of the False-prophet Mohammed". It's universally regarded as a very poor translation, made largely in bad faith. A much better translation was made in the 12th century by the Spanish physician Marco de Toledo, and there have been a number of other Latin translations since then. However, I haven't been able to find any on the 'net.
 

Imber Ranae

Ranunculus Iracundus
nequam dixit:
I hear tell it's not even allowed to be translated?

Like the Bible so very long ago.
It's allowed to be translated, although prayer recitation must be in Arabic. There have been a good deal of recent translations into English and other European languages made by Muslims, probably because they feel translations made by non-Muslims are unreliable. Muslims don't consider any translated versions to be the true Qur'an, however, and they often refer to them as "interpretations" instead, saying that the Qur'an can't truly be translated. I'm sure most think these translations are useful for interesting non-Muslims in Islam, but feel they should never be used as substitutions for the original.
 

Nooj

Civis Illustris
In case anyone's still interested, I found an interesting book called 'Reading the Qur'an in Latin Christendom, 1140-1560', which looks at Latin translations of the Qur'an. There's a preview at Google Books.

Cheers for the help. :)
 
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